Self-reference in action: Arm-movement responses are enhanced in perceptual matching

Clea Desebrock, Jie Sui, Charles Spence

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Considerable evidence now shows that making a reference to the self in a task modulates attention, perception, memory, and decision-making. Furthermore, the self-reference effect (SRE) cannot be reduced to domain-general factors (e.g., reward value) and is supported by distinct neural circuitry. However, it remains unknown whether self-associations modulate response execution as well. This was tested in the present study. Participants carried out a perceptual-matching task, and movement time (MT) was measured separately from reaction-time (RT; drawing on methodology from the literature on intelligence). A response box recorded ‘home’-button-releases (measuring RT from stimulus onset); and a target-key positioned 14 cm from the response box recorded MT (from ‘home’-button-release to target-key depression). MTs of responses to self- as compared with other-person-associated stimuli were faster (with a higher proportion correct for self-related responses). We present a novel demonstration that the SRE can modulate the execution of rapid-aiming arm-movement responses. Implications of the findings are discussed, along with suggestions to guide and inspire future work in investigating how the SRE influences action.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)258-266
Number of pages9
JournalActa Psychologica
Volume190
Early online date25 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2018

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Ego
Intelligence
Reward
Reaction Time
Decision Making
Depression
Self-reference
Stimulus

Keywords

  • Movement time
  • Rapid arm movements
  • Self-prioritization
  • Self-reference effect
  • Visuomotor processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Self-reference in action : Arm-movement responses are enhanced in perceptual matching. / Desebrock, Clea; Sui, Jie; Spence, Charles.

In: Acta Psychologica, Vol. 190, 01.10.2018, p. 258-266.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Desebrock, Clea ; Sui, Jie ; Spence, Charles. / Self-reference in action : Arm-movement responses are enhanced in perceptual matching. In: Acta Psychologica. 2018 ; Vol. 190. pp. 258-266.
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