Self-Control and Touch: When Does Direct Versus Indirect Touch Increase Hedonic Evaluations and Consumption of Food

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4 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Could directly touching food with hands make it tastier and more desirable? The present paper presents four studies that explore how sampling and eating food by touching it directly with hands affects hedonic evaluations and consumption volume. The studies demonstrate that for consumers who apply self-control in their food consumption (high self-control consumers) touching food directly with hands enhances the sensory experience and increases hedonic evaluations of the food. Importantly, direct touch increases the consumption volume for high self-control consumers. These findings contribute to understanding of how touch as a proximal sensory factor affects food evaluation and consumption, and thus offer retailing implications in the context of in-store food sampling, food catering, presentation and consumption of food in restaurants.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)170-185
Number of pages16
JournalJournal of Retailing
Volume95
Issue number4
Early online date7 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2019

Keywords

  • Food consumption
  • Haptics
  • Retail consumer behavior
  • Sensory marketing
  • Tactile input
  • Touch

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Marketing

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