Sedentary time and markers of inflammation in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

C.L. Falconer, A.R. Cooper, J.P. Walhin, D. Thompson, A.S. Page, T.J. Peters, A.A. Montgomery, D.J. Sharp, C.M. Dayan, R.C. Andrews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Citations (Scopus)
88 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Background and aims: We investigated whether objectively measured sedentary time was associated with markers of inflammation in adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods and results: We studied 285 adults (184 men, 101 women, mean age 59.0 ± 9.7) who had been recruited to the Early ACTivity in Diabetes (Early ACTID) randomised controlled trial. C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and accelerometer-determined sedentary time and moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were measured at baseline and after six-months. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the independent cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of sedentary time with markers of inflammation. At baseline, associations between sedentary time and IL-6 were observed in men and women, an association that was attenuated following adjustment for waist circumference. After 6 months of follow-up, sedentary time was reduced by 0.4 ± 1.2 h per day in women, with the change in sedentary time predicting CRP at follow-up. Every hour decrease in sedentary time between baseline and six-months was associated with 24% (1, 48) lower CRP. No changes in sedentary time between baseline and 6 months were seen in men. Conclusions: Higher sedentary time is associated with IL-6 in men and women with type 2 diabetes, and reducing sedentary time is associated with improved levels of CRP in women. Interventions to reduce sedentary time may help to reduce inflammation in women with type 2 diabetes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)956-962
JournalNutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases
Volume24
Issue number9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2014

Fingerprint

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Inflammation
C-Reactive Protein
Interleukin-6
Adiponectin
Waist Circumference
Linear Models
Randomized Controlled Trials
Regression Analysis
Exercise

Cite this

Sedentary time and markers of inflammation in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. / Falconer, C.L.; Cooper, A.R.; Walhin, J.P.; Thompson, D.; Page, A.S.; Peters, T.J.; Montgomery, A.A.; Sharp, D.J.; Dayan, C.M.; Andrews, R.C.

In: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, Vol. 24, No. 9, 09.2014, p. 956-962.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Falconer, CL, Cooper, AR, Walhin, JP, Thompson, D, Page, AS, Peters, TJ, Montgomery, AA, Sharp, DJ, Dayan, CM & Andrews, RC 2014, 'Sedentary time and markers of inflammation in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes', Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases, vol. 24, no. 9, pp. 956-962. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2014.03.009
Falconer, C.L. ; Cooper, A.R. ; Walhin, J.P. ; Thompson, D. ; Page, A.S. ; Peters, T.J. ; Montgomery, A.A. ; Sharp, D.J. ; Dayan, C.M. ; Andrews, R.C. / Sedentary time and markers of inflammation in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. In: Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases. 2014 ; Vol. 24, No. 9. pp. 956-962.
@article{df4fdc893eb041c49b0acc1b365a463a,
title = "Sedentary time and markers of inflammation in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes",
abstract = "Background and aims: We investigated whether objectively measured sedentary time was associated with markers of inflammation in adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods and results: We studied 285 adults (184 men, 101 women, mean age 59.0 ± 9.7) who had been recruited to the Early ACTivity in Diabetes (Early ACTID) randomised controlled trial. C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and accelerometer-determined sedentary time and moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were measured at baseline and after six-months. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the independent cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of sedentary time with markers of inflammation. At baseline, associations between sedentary time and IL-6 were observed in men and women, an association that was attenuated following adjustment for waist circumference. After 6 months of follow-up, sedentary time was reduced by 0.4 ± 1.2 h per day in women, with the change in sedentary time predicting CRP at follow-up. Every hour decrease in sedentary time between baseline and six-months was associated with 24{\%} (1, 48) lower CRP. No changes in sedentary time between baseline and 6 months were seen in men. Conclusions: Higher sedentary time is associated with IL-6 in men and women with type 2 diabetes, and reducing sedentary time is associated with improved levels of CRP in women. Interventions to reduce sedentary time may help to reduce inflammation in women with type 2 diabetes.",
author = "C.L. Falconer and A.R. Cooper and J.P. Walhin and D. Thompson and A.S. Page and T.J. Peters and A.A. Montgomery and D.J. Sharp and C.M. Dayan and R.C. Andrews",
year = "2014",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1016/j.numecd.2014.03.009",
language = "English",
volume = "24",
pages = "956--962",
journal = "Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases",
issn = "0939-4753",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Sedentary time and markers of inflammation in people with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes

AU - Falconer, C.L.

AU - Cooper, A.R.

AU - Walhin, J.P.

AU - Thompson, D.

AU - Page, A.S.

AU - Peters, T.J.

AU - Montgomery, A.A.

AU - Sharp, D.J.

AU - Dayan, C.M.

AU - Andrews, R.C.

PY - 2014/9

Y1 - 2014/9

N2 - Background and aims: We investigated whether objectively measured sedentary time was associated with markers of inflammation in adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods and results: We studied 285 adults (184 men, 101 women, mean age 59.0 ± 9.7) who had been recruited to the Early ACTivity in Diabetes (Early ACTID) randomised controlled trial. C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and accelerometer-determined sedentary time and moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were measured at baseline and after six-months. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the independent cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of sedentary time with markers of inflammation. At baseline, associations between sedentary time and IL-6 were observed in men and women, an association that was attenuated following adjustment for waist circumference. After 6 months of follow-up, sedentary time was reduced by 0.4 ± 1.2 h per day in women, with the change in sedentary time predicting CRP at follow-up. Every hour decrease in sedentary time between baseline and six-months was associated with 24% (1, 48) lower CRP. No changes in sedentary time between baseline and 6 months were seen in men. Conclusions: Higher sedentary time is associated with IL-6 in men and women with type 2 diabetes, and reducing sedentary time is associated with improved levels of CRP in women. Interventions to reduce sedentary time may help to reduce inflammation in women with type 2 diabetes.

AB - Background and aims: We investigated whether objectively measured sedentary time was associated with markers of inflammation in adults with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes. Methods and results: We studied 285 adults (184 men, 101 women, mean age 59.0 ± 9.7) who had been recruited to the Early ACTivity in Diabetes (Early ACTID) randomised controlled trial. C-reactive protein (CRP), adiponectin, soluble intracellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and accelerometer-determined sedentary time and moderate-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) were measured at baseline and after six-months. Linear regression analysis was used to investigate the independent cross-sectional and longitudinal associations of sedentary time with markers of inflammation. At baseline, associations between sedentary time and IL-6 were observed in men and women, an association that was attenuated following adjustment for waist circumference. After 6 months of follow-up, sedentary time was reduced by 0.4 ± 1.2 h per day in women, with the change in sedentary time predicting CRP at follow-up. Every hour decrease in sedentary time between baseline and six-months was associated with 24% (1, 48) lower CRP. No changes in sedentary time between baseline and 6 months were seen in men. Conclusions: Higher sedentary time is associated with IL-6 in men and women with type 2 diabetes, and reducing sedentary time is associated with improved levels of CRP in women. Interventions to reduce sedentary time may help to reduce inflammation in women with type 2 diabetes.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84901728415&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.numecd.2014.03.009

U2 - 10.1016/j.numecd.2014.03.009

DO - 10.1016/j.numecd.2014.03.009

M3 - Article

VL - 24

SP - 956

EP - 962

JO - Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

JF - Nutrition, Metabolism and Cardiovascular Diseases

SN - 0939-4753

IS - 9

ER -