Security and the Internet: Barbarians at the gate

Paul Cornish

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Over the last decade, the study of security has been affected by two revolutions: the ending of the Cold War in Europe; and the growth of the internet. The first removed the adversarial rationale which had underpinned defence and security thinking and practice since 1945. The physical manifestations of the Cold War - massive military research and development projects, conscript armies, vast surface and submarine fleets - all became obsolete in an instant. Defence would now be but one item in a new agenda which would include human, environmental and economic security. Defence institutions and the defence mind-set have been shaped by this political revolution, but have so far not been overwhelmed by it. The internet revolution, however, represents an altogether greater, more fundamental challenge; this, at least, is the claim of the revolutionaries.
Original languageEnglish
JournalThe World Today
Volume57
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2001

Fingerprint

Barbarians
World Wide Web
Revolution
Cold War
Fundamental
Economics
Submarine
Army
Agenda
Military
Fleet
Manifestation
Physical
Instant

Cite this

Security and the Internet: Barbarians at the gate. / Cornish, Paul.

In: The World Today, Vol. 57, No. 2, 02.2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cornish, Paul. / Security and the Internet: Barbarians at the gate. In: The World Today. 2001 ; Vol. 57, No. 2.
@article{0621ced2309c4686988fa5e73839deef,
title = "Security and the Internet: Barbarians at the gate",
abstract = "Over the last decade, the study of security has been affected by two revolutions: the ending of the Cold War in Europe; and the growth of the internet. The first removed the adversarial rationale which had underpinned defence and security thinking and practice since 1945. The physical manifestations of the Cold War - massive military research and development projects, conscript armies, vast surface and submarine fleets - all became obsolete in an instant. Defence would now be but one item in a new agenda which would include human, environmental and economic security. Defence institutions and the defence mind-set have been shaped by this political revolution, but have so far not been overwhelmed by it. The internet revolution, however, represents an altogether greater, more fundamental challenge; this, at least, is the claim of the revolutionaries.",
author = "Paul Cornish",
year = "2001",
month = "2",
language = "English",
volume = "57",
journal = "The World Today",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Security and the Internet: Barbarians at the gate

AU - Cornish, Paul

PY - 2001/2

Y1 - 2001/2

N2 - Over the last decade, the study of security has been affected by two revolutions: the ending of the Cold War in Europe; and the growth of the internet. The first removed the adversarial rationale which had underpinned defence and security thinking and practice since 1945. The physical manifestations of the Cold War - massive military research and development projects, conscript armies, vast surface and submarine fleets - all became obsolete in an instant. Defence would now be but one item in a new agenda which would include human, environmental and economic security. Defence institutions and the defence mind-set have been shaped by this political revolution, but have so far not been overwhelmed by it. The internet revolution, however, represents an altogether greater, more fundamental challenge; this, at least, is the claim of the revolutionaries.

AB - Over the last decade, the study of security has been affected by two revolutions: the ending of the Cold War in Europe; and the growth of the internet. The first removed the adversarial rationale which had underpinned defence and security thinking and practice since 1945. The physical manifestations of the Cold War - massive military research and development projects, conscript armies, vast surface and submarine fleets - all became obsolete in an instant. Defence would now be but one item in a new agenda which would include human, environmental and economic security. Defence institutions and the defence mind-set have been shaped by this political revolution, but have so far not been overwhelmed by it. The internet revolution, however, represents an altogether greater, more fundamental challenge; this, at least, is the claim of the revolutionaries.

UR - http://www.chathamhouse.org/publications/twt/archive/view/164609

M3 - Article

VL - 57

JO - The World Today

JF - The World Today

IS - 2

ER -