Scanning laser vibrometry and luminol photomicrography to map cavitational activity around ultrasonic scalers

Bernhard Felver, David C. King, Simon C. Lea, Gareth J. Price, A. Damien Walmsley

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Ultrasonic dental scalers are clinically used to remove deposits from tooth surfaces. A metal probe, oscillating at ultrasonic frequencies, is used to chip away deposits from the teeth. To reduce frictional heating, water flows over the operated probe in which a bi-product, cavitation, may be generated. The aim of this study is characterise probe oscillations using scanning laser vibrometry and to relate the recorded data to the occurrence of cavitation that is mapped in the course of this research. Scanning laser vibrometry (Polytec models 300-F/S and 400-3D) was used to measure the movement of various designs of operating probes and to locate vibration nodes / anti-nodes at different generator power settings and contact loads (100g and 200g). Cavitation mapping was performed by photographing the emission from a luminol solution with a digital camera (Artemis ICX285). The scaler design influences the number and location of vibration node / anti-node points. For all ultrasonic probes, the highest displacement amplitude values were recorded at the tip. The highest amounts of cavitation around the probes were recorded at the second anti-node measured from the tip. Broad, beaver-tale shaped probes produced more cavitation than slim shaped ones. The design also influences the amount of inertial cavitation around the operated instrument. The clinical relevance is that broad, beaver-tale shaped probes are unlikely to reach subgingival areas of the tooth. Further research is required to design probes that will be clinically superior to cleaning this area of the tooth.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationEighth International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques
Subtitle of host publicationAdvances and Applications
PublisherSPIE
Number of pages12
Volume7098
ISBN (Print)9780819473264
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 17 Jun 2008
Event8th International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications - Ancona, Italy
Duration: 18 Jun 200820 Jun 2008

Conference

Conference8th International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications
CountryItaly
CityAncona
Period18/06/0820/06/08

Keywords

  • Displacement Amplitude
  • Inertial Cavitation
  • Luminol Photomicrography
  • Scanning Laser Vibrometry
  • Ultrasonic Scaler

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering
  • Condensed Matter Physics

Cite this

Felver, B., King, D. C., Lea, S. C., Price, G. J., & Walmsley, A. D. (2008). Scanning laser vibrometry and luminol photomicrography to map cavitational activity around ultrasonic scalers. In Eighth International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications (Vol. 7098). [70980Q] SPIE. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.803009

Scanning laser vibrometry and luminol photomicrography to map cavitational activity around ultrasonic scalers. / Felver, Bernhard; King, David C.; Lea, Simon C.; Price, Gareth J.; Walmsley, A. Damien.

Eighth International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications. Vol. 7098 SPIE, 2008. 70980Q.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Felver, B, King, DC, Lea, SC, Price, GJ & Walmsley, AD 2008, Scanning laser vibrometry and luminol photomicrography to map cavitational activity around ultrasonic scalers. in Eighth International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications. vol. 7098, 70980Q, SPIE, 8th International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications, Ancona, Italy, 18/06/08. https://doi.org/10.1117/12.803009
Felver B, King DC, Lea SC, Price GJ, Walmsley AD. Scanning laser vibrometry and luminol photomicrography to map cavitational activity around ultrasonic scalers. In Eighth International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications. Vol. 7098. SPIE. 2008. 70980Q https://doi.org/10.1117/12.803009
Felver, Bernhard ; King, David C. ; Lea, Simon C. ; Price, Gareth J. ; Walmsley, A. Damien. / Scanning laser vibrometry and luminol photomicrography to map cavitational activity around ultrasonic scalers. Eighth International Conference on Vibration Measurements by Laser Techniques: Advances and Applications. Vol. 7098 SPIE, 2008.
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