Same name, same game, but is it different? An investigation of female rugby union match events in Canadian Varsity players

Stephen W. West, Isla J. Shill, Christian Clermont, Nina Pavlovic, Joshua Cairns, Berlyn Seselja, Matthew V. Hancock, Simon P. Roberts, Sharief Hendricks, Carolyn A. Emery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

Rugby Union is team-based collision sport with increasing global popularity, particularly in the women's game. Despite this, there is currently no evidence demonstrating the frequency of match events outside of the international game. Therefore, the aim of this study is to outline the frequency and distribution of match events in non-international female rugby union to both outline the demands placed on players and to assess the patterns of play for future injury prevention strategies. Forty-eight games from three seasons of varsity rugby were coded and rates of events per match were calculated. Average ball in play percentage was 51%. The tackle was the most frequent contact match event [280.0 (95% CIs: 270.2-289.7)] while passes were the most frequent non-contact match events [323.2 (95% CIs: 311.8-334.5)]. The distribution of events across match quarter was largely consistent and neither the fixture type, nor the season was consistently associated with differences in match event count per game. This study provides the first analysis of match events outside of international game and provides a useful reference for coaches in preparation of players as well as comparable data for the women's game when informing decision making on injury prevention.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1119-1127
JournalInternational Journal of Sports Science and Coaching
Volume17
Issue number5
Early online date29 Nov 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2022

Keywords

  • Collision sport
  • injury prevention
  • performance analysis
  • tackling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Same name, same game, but is it different? An investigation of female rugby union match events in Canadian Varsity players'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this