Running into injury time: distance running and temporality

Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

33 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Despite a growing body of research on the sociology of time and, analogously, on the sociology of sport, to date there has been relatively little sports literature that takes time as the focus of the analysis. Given the centrality of time as a feature of most sports, this would seem a curious lacuna. The primary aims of this article are to contribute new perspectives on the subjective experience of sporting injury and to analyze some of the temporal dimensions of sporting "injury time" and subsequent rehabilitation. The article is based on data derived from a 2-year autoethnographic research project on 2 middle/long-distance runners, and concludes with some indicative comments regarding the need for sports physiotherapists and other health-care practitioners to take into account the subjective temporal dimension of injury and rehabilitative processes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)331-350
Number of pages20
JournalSociology of Sport Journal
Volume20
Issue number4
Publication statusPublished - 2003

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Running
Sports
Wounds and Injuries
Sociology
sociology of sports
physiotherapist
rehabilitation
sociology
research project
Physical Therapists
health care
Research
time
Rehabilitation
Delivery of Health Care
experience

Cite this

Running into injury time: distance running and temporality. / Allen-Collinson, Jacquelyn.

In: Sociology of Sport Journal, Vol. 20, No. 4, 2003, p. 331-350.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allen-Collinson, J 2003, 'Running into injury time: distance running and temporality', Sociology of Sport Journal, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 331-350.
Allen-Collinson, Jacquelyn. / Running into injury time: distance running and temporality. In: Sociology of Sport Journal. 2003 ; Vol. 20, No. 4. pp. 331-350.
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