Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis of the Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty. A two-year study

S. Glyn-Jones, H. S. Gill, P. McLardy-Smith, D. W. Murray

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

51 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) arthroplasty is a metal-on-metal prosthesis for which no medium- or long-term results have been published. Despite this, it is increasing in popularity as an alternative to stemmed prostheses for younger patients. Since the fixation of the socket is conventional, the major concern is long-term failure of the femoral component. This can be predicted by the use of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA). We have therefore undertaken such a study of the BHR femoral component over a period of two years. Twenty patients (22 hips) underwent a standard BHR procedure. Migration of the femoral component was measured by RSA at intervals of three, six, 12 and 24 months. At 24 months the total three-dimensional migration of the head was 0.2 mm. This was not statistically significant. Previous studies have shown that implants which loosen quickly have rapid early migration. Our results therefore suggest that the BHR femoral component is an inherently stable device which is likely to perform well in the long term.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)172-176
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume
Volume86
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Arthroplasty
Hip
Thigh
Prostheses and Implants
Metals
Head
Equipment and Supplies

Cite this

Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis of the Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty. A two-year study. / Glyn-Jones, S.; Gill, H. S.; McLardy-Smith, P.; Murray, D. W.

In: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume, Vol. 86, No. 2, 2004, p. 172-176.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1b714a66a4614752a47912265ece26fe,
title = "Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis of the Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty. A two-year study",
abstract = "The Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) arthroplasty is a metal-on-metal prosthesis for which no medium- or long-term results have been published. Despite this, it is increasing in popularity as an alternative to stemmed prostheses for younger patients. Since the fixation of the socket is conventional, the major concern is long-term failure of the femoral component. This can be predicted by the use of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA). We have therefore undertaken such a study of the BHR femoral component over a period of two years. Twenty patients (22 hips) underwent a standard BHR procedure. Migration of the femoral component was measured by RSA at intervals of three, six, 12 and 24 months. At 24 months the total three-dimensional migration of the head was 0.2 mm. This was not statistically significant. Previous studies have shown that implants which loosen quickly have rapid early migration. Our results therefore suggest that the BHR femoral component is an inherently stable device which is likely to perform well in the long term.",
author = "S. Glyn-Jones and Gill, {H. S.} and P. McLardy-Smith and Murray, {D. W.}",
year = "2004",
doi = "10.1302/0301-620X.86B2.14371",
language = "English",
volume = "86",
pages = "172--176",
journal = "Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume",
issn = "0301-620X",
publisher = "British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis of the Birmingham hip resurfacing arthroplasty. A two-year study

AU - Glyn-Jones, S.

AU - Gill, H. S.

AU - McLardy-Smith, P.

AU - Murray, D. W.

PY - 2004

Y1 - 2004

N2 - The Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) arthroplasty is a metal-on-metal prosthesis for which no medium- or long-term results have been published. Despite this, it is increasing in popularity as an alternative to stemmed prostheses for younger patients. Since the fixation of the socket is conventional, the major concern is long-term failure of the femoral component. This can be predicted by the use of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA). We have therefore undertaken such a study of the BHR femoral component over a period of two years. Twenty patients (22 hips) underwent a standard BHR procedure. Migration of the femoral component was measured by RSA at intervals of three, six, 12 and 24 months. At 24 months the total three-dimensional migration of the head was 0.2 mm. This was not statistically significant. Previous studies have shown that implants which loosen quickly have rapid early migration. Our results therefore suggest that the BHR femoral component is an inherently stable device which is likely to perform well in the long term.

AB - The Birmingham hip resurfacing (BHR) arthroplasty is a metal-on-metal prosthesis for which no medium- or long-term results have been published. Despite this, it is increasing in popularity as an alternative to stemmed prostheses for younger patients. Since the fixation of the socket is conventional, the major concern is long-term failure of the femoral component. This can be predicted by the use of roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis (RSA). We have therefore undertaken such a study of the BHR femoral component over a period of two years. Twenty patients (22 hips) underwent a standard BHR procedure. Migration of the femoral component was measured by RSA at intervals of three, six, 12 and 24 months. At 24 months the total three-dimensional migration of the head was 0.2 mm. This was not statistically significant. Previous studies have shown that implants which loosen quickly have rapid early migration. Our results therefore suggest that the BHR femoral component is an inherently stable device which is likely to perform well in the long term.

UR - http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=15046428

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1302/0301-620X.86B2.14371

U2 - 10.1302/0301-620X.86B2.14371

DO - 10.1302/0301-620X.86B2.14371

M3 - Article

VL - 86

SP - 172

EP - 176

JO - Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume

JF - Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - British Volume

SN - 0301-620X

IS - 2

ER -