Robots should be slaves

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Robots should not be described as persons, nor given legal nor moral responsibility for their actions. Robots are fully owned by us. We determine their goals and behaviour, either directly or indirectly through specifying their intelligence or how their intelligence is acquired. In humanising them, we not only further dehumanise real people, but also encourage poor human decision making in the allocation of resources and responsibility. This is true at both the individual and the institutional level. This chapter describes both causes and consequences of these errors, including consequences already present in society. I make specific proposals for best incorporating robots into our society. The potential of robotics should be understood as the potential to extend our own abilities and to address our own goals.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationClose engagements with artificial companions: key social, psychological, ethical and design issues
EditorsYorick Wilks
Place of PublicationAmsterdam
PublisherJohn Benjamins Publishing Company
Pages63-74
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9789027288400
ISBN (Print)9789027249944
Publication statusPublished - 2010

Publication series

NameNatural Language Processing
Volume8

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  • Cite this

    Bryson, J. J. (2010). Robots should be slaves. In Y. Wilks (Ed.), Close engagements with artificial companions: key social, psychological, ethical and design issues (pp. 63-74). (Natural Language Processing; Vol. 8). John Benjamins Publishing Company.