Risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease in people with psoriatic arthritis: a population based cohort study

PROMPT Study Group

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Background: The risk of uveitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is well documented however, the magnitude of risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in people with PsA or psoriasis is less consistent in the literature. The aim of this study was to calculate the incidence and prevalence of uveitis and IBD in patients with PsA and psoriasis alone and compare this with the general population in the UK.

Methods: Incident cases of PsA, aged 18–89 at time of diagnosis, were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, 1998–2014 using Read codes and prescription data. Cases of PsA were matched by age, sex, general practice, and the date of the PsA diagnosis (index date) to two randomly selected cohorts: patients with psoriasis only and a general population cohort with no PsA or psoriasis. Prevalent cases of uveitis and IBD had an earliest date of diagnosis on or before their index date; incident cases were those with a first date of diagnosis after their index date. Incidence Rate Ratios of uveitis and IBD in psoriatic disease compared with the general population were calculated using Poisson regression.

Results: There were 6,783 (49% males) incident cases of PsA that were matched to 27,132 patients with psoriasis and 27,132 patients from the general population. The mean age at PsA diagnosis was 49.2 years. The prevalence on the index date, and incidence rates of uveitis and IBD in the study population are shown in Table 1. The incidence of uveitis was significantly higher in patients with PsA and with psoriasis than in the general population. The incidence of Crohn’s Disease, but not Ulcerative Colitis (UC) was higher in patients with PsA than in the general population but not in patients with psoriasis alone.

Conclusion: In this large population based study we report an increased risk of developing Crohn’s Disease, but not UC, among patients with PsA. We also report an increased risk of developing uveitis among patients with PsA over those with psoriasis alone or the general population.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationRheumatology
Number of pages2
Volume56
EditionSuppl 2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2017

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Psoriatic Arthritis
Uveitis
Inflammatory Bowel Diseases
Cohort Studies
Psoriasis
Population
Incidence
Ulcerative Colitis
Crohn Disease
General Practice
Prescriptions
Early Diagnosis

Cite this

Risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease in people with psoriatic arthritis: a population based cohort study. / PROMPT Study Group.

Rheumatology. Vol. 56 Suppl 2. ed. 2017. 048.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

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title = "Risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease in people with psoriatic arthritis: a population based cohort study",
abstract = "Background: The risk of uveitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is well documented however, the magnitude of risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in people with PsA or psoriasis is less consistent in the literature. The aim of this study was to calculate the incidence and prevalence of uveitis and IBD in patients with PsA and psoriasis alone and compare this with the general population in the UK.Methods: Incident cases of PsA, aged 18–89 at time of diagnosis, were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, 1998–2014 using Read codes and prescription data. Cases of PsA were matched by age, sex, general practice, and the date of the PsA diagnosis (index date) to two randomly selected cohorts: patients with psoriasis only and a general population cohort with no PsA or psoriasis. Prevalent cases of uveitis and IBD had an earliest date of diagnosis on or before their index date; incident cases were those with a first date of diagnosis after their index date. Incidence Rate Ratios of uveitis and IBD in psoriatic disease compared with the general population were calculated using Poisson regression.Results: There were 6,783 (49{\%} males) incident cases of PsA that were matched to 27,132 patients with psoriasis and 27,132 patients from the general population. The mean age at PsA diagnosis was 49.2 years. The prevalence on the index date, and incidence rates of uveitis and IBD in the study population are shown in Table 1. The incidence of uveitis was significantly higher in patients with PsA and with psoriasis than in the general population. The incidence of Crohn’s Disease, but not Ulcerative Colitis (UC) was higher in patients with PsA than in the general population but not in patients with psoriasis alone.Conclusion: In this large population based study we report an increased risk of developing Crohn’s Disease, but not UC, among patients with PsA. We also report an increased risk of developing uveitis among patients with PsA over those with psoriasis alone or the general population.",
author = "Rachel Charlton and Julia Snowball and Alison Nightingale and William Tillett and Amelia Green and Catherine Smith and Gavin Shaddick and Neil McHugh and {PROMPT Study Group}",
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AU - Charlton, Rachel

AU - Snowball, Julia

AU - Nightingale, Alison

AU - Tillett, William

AU - Green, Amelia

AU - Smith, Catherine

AU - Shaddick, Gavin

AU - McHugh, Neil

AU - PROMPT Study Group

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N2 - Background: The risk of uveitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is well documented however, the magnitude of risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in people with PsA or psoriasis is less consistent in the literature. The aim of this study was to calculate the incidence and prevalence of uveitis and IBD in patients with PsA and psoriasis alone and compare this with the general population in the UK.Methods: Incident cases of PsA, aged 18–89 at time of diagnosis, were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, 1998–2014 using Read codes and prescription data. Cases of PsA were matched by age, sex, general practice, and the date of the PsA diagnosis (index date) to two randomly selected cohorts: patients with psoriasis only and a general population cohort with no PsA or psoriasis. Prevalent cases of uveitis and IBD had an earliest date of diagnosis on or before their index date; incident cases were those with a first date of diagnosis after their index date. Incidence Rate Ratios of uveitis and IBD in psoriatic disease compared with the general population were calculated using Poisson regression.Results: There were 6,783 (49% males) incident cases of PsA that were matched to 27,132 patients with psoriasis and 27,132 patients from the general population. The mean age at PsA diagnosis was 49.2 years. The prevalence on the index date, and incidence rates of uveitis and IBD in the study population are shown in Table 1. The incidence of uveitis was significantly higher in patients with PsA and with psoriasis than in the general population. The incidence of Crohn’s Disease, but not Ulcerative Colitis (UC) was higher in patients with PsA than in the general population but not in patients with psoriasis alone.Conclusion: In this large population based study we report an increased risk of developing Crohn’s Disease, but not UC, among patients with PsA. We also report an increased risk of developing uveitis among patients with PsA over those with psoriasis alone or the general population.

AB - Background: The risk of uveitis in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is well documented however, the magnitude of risk of uveitis and inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) in people with PsA or psoriasis is less consistent in the literature. The aim of this study was to calculate the incidence and prevalence of uveitis and IBD in patients with PsA and psoriasis alone and compare this with the general population in the UK.Methods: Incident cases of PsA, aged 18–89 at time of diagnosis, were identified from the Clinical Practice Research Datalink, 1998–2014 using Read codes and prescription data. Cases of PsA were matched by age, sex, general practice, and the date of the PsA diagnosis (index date) to two randomly selected cohorts: patients with psoriasis only and a general population cohort with no PsA or psoriasis. Prevalent cases of uveitis and IBD had an earliest date of diagnosis on or before their index date; incident cases were those with a first date of diagnosis after their index date. Incidence Rate Ratios of uveitis and IBD in psoriatic disease compared with the general population were calculated using Poisson regression.Results: There were 6,783 (49% males) incident cases of PsA that were matched to 27,132 patients with psoriasis and 27,132 patients from the general population. The mean age at PsA diagnosis was 49.2 years. The prevalence on the index date, and incidence rates of uveitis and IBD in the study population are shown in Table 1. The incidence of uveitis was significantly higher in patients with PsA and with psoriasis than in the general population. The incidence of Crohn’s Disease, but not Ulcerative Colitis (UC) was higher in patients with PsA than in the general population but not in patients with psoriasis alone.Conclusion: In this large population based study we report an increased risk of developing Crohn’s Disease, but not UC, among patients with PsA. We also report an increased risk of developing uveitis among patients with PsA over those with psoriasis alone or the general population.

U2 - 10.1093/rheumatology/kex062.048

DO - 10.1093/rheumatology/kex062.048

M3 - Conference contribution

VL - 56

BT - Rheumatology

ER -