Risk of myocardial infarction in men and women with type 2 diabetes in the UK: a cohort study using the General Practice Research Database

H E Mulnier, H E Seaman, V S Raleigh, S S Soedamah-Muthu, H M Colhoun, R A Lawrenson, Corinne S de Vries

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

39 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Aims/hypothesis: Our primary aim was to establish reliable and generalisable estimates of the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) for men and women with type 2 diabetes in the UK compared with people without diabetes. Our secondary aim was to investigate how the MI risk associated with diabetes differs between men and women.

Methods: A cohort study using the General Practice Research Database (1992-1999) was carried out, selecting 40,727 patients with type 2 diabetes and 194,913 age and sex-matched patients without diabetes. Rates of MI in men and women with and without diabetes were derived, as were hazard ratios for MI adjusted for known risk factors.

Results: The rate of MI in men with type 2 diabetes was 19.74 (95% CI 18.83-20.69) per 1,000 person-years compared with 16.18 (95% CI 15.33-17.08) per 1,000 person-years in women with type 2 diabetes. The overall adjusted relative risk of MI in diabetes versus no diabetes was 2.13 (95% CI 2.01-2.26) in men and 2.95 (95% CI 2.75-3.17) in women and decreased with age in both sexes. Women with type 2 diabetes aged 35 to 54 years were at almost five times the risk of MI compared with women of the same age without diabetes (HR 4.86 [95% CI 2.78-8.51]).

Conclusions/interpretation: This study has demonstrated that women with type 2 diabetes are at a much greater relative risk of MI than men even when adjusted for risk factors.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1639-1645
Number of pages7
JournalDiabetologia
Volume51
Issue number9
Early online date25 Jun 2008
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Sep 2008

Keywords

  • risk
  • primary care
  • myocardial infarction
  • type 2 diabetes
  • risk factors
  • database

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