Restoration and Loss after Disaster

Applying the Dual Process Model of Coping in Bereavement

Ruth McManus, Julian Walter, Leon Claridge

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

18 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The article asks whether disasters that destroy life but leave the material infrastructure relatively intact tend to prompt communal coping focusing on loss, while disasters that destroy significant material infrastructure tend to prompt coping through restoration/rebuilding. After comparing memorials to New Zealand’s Christchurch earthquake and Pike River mine disasters, we outline circumstances in which collective restorative endeavor may be grassroots, organized from above, or manipulated, along with limits to effective restoration. We conclude that bereavement literature may need to take restoration more seriously, while disaster literature may need to take loss more seriously.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)405-414
Number of pages10
JournalDeath Studies
Volume42
Issue number7
Early online date4 Jan 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2018

Fingerprint

Bereavement
Disasters
restoration
disaster
coping
Esocidae
infrastructure
Earthquakes
memorial
New Zealand
Rivers
natural disaster
river
Restoration
Dual-process Models
Disaster
literature
Prompts

Keywords

  • communal loss, earthquake, grief, communitas, volunteers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Restoration and Loss after Disaster : Applying the Dual Process Model of Coping in Bereavement. / McManus, Ruth; Walter, Julian; Claridge, Leon.

In: Death Studies, Vol. 42, No. 7, 2018, p. 405-414.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{890c6ec6e21e4796bb51e5c2807898fd,
title = "Restoration and Loss after Disaster: Applying the Dual Process Model of Coping in Bereavement",
abstract = "The article asks whether disasters that destroy life but leave the material infrastructure relatively intact tend to prompt communal coping focusing on loss, while disasters that destroy significant material infrastructure tend to prompt coping through restoration/rebuilding. After comparing memorials to New Zealand’s Christchurch earthquake and Pike River mine disasters, we outline circumstances in which collective restorative endeavor may be grassroots, organized from above, or manipulated, along with limits to effective restoration. We conclude that bereavement literature may need to take restoration more seriously, while disaster literature may need to take loss more seriously.",
keywords = "communal loss, earthquake, grief, communitas, volunteers",
author = "Ruth McManus and Julian Walter and Leon Claridge",
year = "2018",
doi = "10.1080/07481187.2017.1366599",
language = "English",
volume = "42",
pages = "405--414",
journal = "Death Studies",
issn = "0748-1187",
publisher = "Taylor and Francis",
number = "7",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Restoration and Loss after Disaster

T2 - Applying the Dual Process Model of Coping in Bereavement

AU - McManus, Ruth

AU - Walter, Julian

AU - Claridge, Leon

PY - 2018

Y1 - 2018

N2 - The article asks whether disasters that destroy life but leave the material infrastructure relatively intact tend to prompt communal coping focusing on loss, while disasters that destroy significant material infrastructure tend to prompt coping through restoration/rebuilding. After comparing memorials to New Zealand’s Christchurch earthquake and Pike River mine disasters, we outline circumstances in which collective restorative endeavor may be grassroots, organized from above, or manipulated, along with limits to effective restoration. We conclude that bereavement literature may need to take restoration more seriously, while disaster literature may need to take loss more seriously.

AB - The article asks whether disasters that destroy life but leave the material infrastructure relatively intact tend to prompt communal coping focusing on loss, while disasters that destroy significant material infrastructure tend to prompt coping through restoration/rebuilding. After comparing memorials to New Zealand’s Christchurch earthquake and Pike River mine disasters, we outline circumstances in which collective restorative endeavor may be grassroots, organized from above, or manipulated, along with limits to effective restoration. We conclude that bereavement literature may need to take restoration more seriously, while disaster literature may need to take loss more seriously.

KW - communal loss, earthquake, grief, communitas, volunteers

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85043371457&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/07481187.2017.1366599

DO - 10.1080/07481187.2017.1366599

M3 - Article

VL - 42

SP - 405

EP - 414

JO - Death Studies

JF - Death Studies

SN - 0748-1187

IS - 7

ER -