Residential treatment settings for adolescent chronic pain management: rationale, development and evidence

C Eccleston, H Connell, N Carmichael

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We argue that an option for a residential treatment setting is sensible in developed health care economies. First, an analysis of the public health study of chronic pain finds that there is no good public health evidence base for any adolescent chronic pain intervention. Second, a conceptual analysis is undertaken for why removal of adolescents from their normal environments may offer a useful therapeutic option. Third, examples of current residential models, including summer camps and residential treatments, are given, and a more in-depth description is given of the Bath Pain Management Unit in the United Kingdom. Fourth, further discussion is provided on the barriers that often arise when stakeholders in children’s pain services attempt to persuade each other of the importance or otherwise of intensive treatments. Finally, advice is given regarding how to develop and sustain an evidence-supported chronic pain management service for adolescents in chronic pain.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationBringing Pain Relief to Children
EditorsGA Finley, PJ McGrath, CT Chambers
Place of PublicationOttawa, NJ
PublisherHumana Press
Pages85-112
ISBN (Electronic)9781597451253
ISBN (Print)978158829-6283
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2006

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    Eccleston, C., Connell, H., & Carmichael, N. (2006). Residential treatment settings for adolescent chronic pain management: rationale, development and evidence. In GA. Finley, PJ. McGrath, & CT. Chambers (Eds.), Bringing Pain Relief to Children (pp. 85-112). Humana Press. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-1-59745-125-3_4