Removal of CO2 from a submersible atmosphere by scrubbing with water: Experiments in a single column

Stanislaw Kolaczkowski, Serpil Awdry, Chien Le, M L Nuckols, T. Smith, D. Thomas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

In order to explore methods of removing CO2 from submersible habitats with sea water, gas scrubbing experiments (using tap water, and tap water with 3.5 wt% sea salt) were performed in a 108 mm i.d. pilot-scale column, investigating the removal efficiency of CO2 (e.g. at 2 vol%) from a gaseous stream. The performance of this column fitted with 5 spray nozzles was compared with a column packed with 1/8th in. Dixon rings (packing depth = 1480 mm). More detailed experiments were then performed in the column packed with Dixon rings at: liquid flows from 4 to 8 dm3 min−1; gas flows 18 and 36 N dm3 min−1, column pressures = 1 and 4 bar(g); column temperatures approximately 5 and 17 °C. In general, CO2 removal increased as column operating pressure was increased, or fluid temperature was decreased. When approaching low gas outlet CO2 levels at the top of the column (e.g. 0.1 vol%), the concentration of carbonate species in the tap water (fed into the column) restricted further improvements in the performance of the column.

In experiments in a short column with Dixon rings (packing depth = 180 mm), using fresh water in each column, the performance of a multi-column eight chamber compact scrubber was simulated, and shown to be significantly better than a single tall column.
LanguageEnglish
Pages157 - 169
Number of pages13
JournalChemical Engineering Research & Design
Volume100
Early online date11 May 2015
DOIs
StatusPublished - Aug 2015

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Water
Experiments
Gases
Spray nozzles
Scrubbers
Carbonates
Flow of gases
Salts
Temperature
Fluids
Liquids

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Removal of CO2 from a submersible atmosphere by scrubbing with water : Experiments in a single column. / Kolaczkowski, Stanislaw; Awdry, Serpil; Le, Chien; Nuckols, M L; Smith, T.; Thomas, D.

In: Chemical Engineering Research & Design, Vol. 100, 08.2015, p. 157 - 169.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "In order to explore methods of removing CO2 from submersible habitats with sea water, gas scrubbing experiments (using tap water, and tap water with 3.5 wt{\%} sea salt) were performed in a 108 mm i.d. pilot-scale column, investigating the removal efficiency of CO2 (e.g. at 2 vol{\%}) from a gaseous stream. The performance of this column fitted with 5 spray nozzles was compared with a column packed with 1/8th in. Dixon rings (packing depth = 1480 mm). More detailed experiments were then performed in the column packed with Dixon rings at: liquid flows from 4 to 8 dm3 min−1; gas flows 18 and 36 N dm3 min−1, column pressures = 1 and 4 bar(g); column temperatures approximately 5 and 17 °C. In general, CO2 removal increased as column operating pressure was increased, or fluid temperature was decreased. When approaching low gas outlet CO2 levels at the top of the column (e.g. 0.1 vol{\%}), the concentration of carbonate species in the tap water (fed into the column) restricted further improvements in the performance of the column.In experiments in a short column with Dixon rings (packing depth = 180 mm), using fresh water in each column, the performance of a multi-column eight chamber compact scrubber was simulated, and shown to be significantly better than a single tall column.",
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