Remaking the Law to Protect Civilians: Overlapping Jurisdictions and Contested Spaces in UN Protection of Civilian Sites

Naomi Pendle, Alice Robinson, Andrew Apiny, Gatkuoth Mut Gai

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (SciVal)

Abstract

The UN Protection of Civilians sites in South Sudan were separated from adjacent towns by barbed wire fences, mounds, watchtowers and patrolling peacekeepers. Building on and contributing to recent legal geography scholarship on jurisdictions, we explore how legal norms, institutions and rivalrous claims of jurisdiction remake these places of protection and blur spatial boundaries by creating trails that entangle the worlds inside and outside of the sites. The article also provides an unusual example of a powerful public authority – the United Nations – resisting claims that they have jurisdiction. The article is based on qualitative research in Wau and Bentiu.
Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Intervention and Statebuilding
Early online date6 Jul 2023
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Jul 2023

Bibliographical note

Funding Information:
We are incredibly grateful to the interviewees who shared their stories with us, and for others who let us live among them. We are grateful for the support of the AHRC-FCDO funded Safety of Strangers (SoS) grant that funded both the empirical work and time for mentorship that accompanied the writing of this article.

Keywords

  • Protection
  • South Sudan
  • jurisdiction
  • law
  • legal geography
  • peacekeeping

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Law
  • Political Science and International Relations

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