Reliability and validity of depth camera 3D scanning to determine thigh volume

Mehdi Kordi, Nicos Haralabidis, Matthew Huby, Paul R. Barratt, Glyn Howatson, Jon Stephen Wheat

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Gross thigh volume is a key anthropometric variable to predict sport performance and health. Currently, it is either estimated by using the frustum method, which is prone to high inter-and intra-observer error, or using medical imaging, which is expensive and time consuming. Depth camera 3D-imaging systems offer a cheap alternative to measure thigh volume but no between-session reliability or comparison to medical imaging has been made. This experiment established between-session reliability and examined agreement with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Forty-eight male cyclists had their thigh volume measured by the depth camera system on two occasions to establish between-session reliability. A subset of 32 participants also had lower body MRIs, through which agreement between the depth camera system and MRI was established. The results showed low between-session variability (CV = 1.7%; Absolute Typical Error = 112 cm3) when measuring thigh volume using the depth camera system. The depth camera systematically measured gross thigh volume 32.6cm3 lower than MRI. These results suggest that depth camera 3D-imaging systems are reliable tools for measuring thigh volume and show good agreement with MRI scanners, providing a cheap and time-saving alternative to medical imaging analysis.

LanguageEnglish
Pages1-6
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Sports Sciences
Early online date31 May 2018
DOIs
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 31 May 2018

Fingerprint

Thigh
Reproducibility of Results
Diagnostic Imaging
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Athletic Performance
Health

Keywords

  • 3D body scanning
  • anthropometry
  • Kinanthropometry
  • surface imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Cite this

Reliability and validity of depth camera 3D scanning to determine thigh volume. / Kordi, Mehdi; Haralabidis, Nicos; Huby, Matthew; Barratt, Paul R.; Howatson, Glyn; Wheat, Jon Stephen.

In: Journal of Sports Sciences, 31.05.2018, p. 1-6.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kordi, Mehdi ; Haralabidis, Nicos ; Huby, Matthew ; Barratt, Paul R. ; Howatson, Glyn ; Wheat, Jon Stephen. / Reliability and validity of depth camera 3D scanning to determine thigh volume. In: Journal of Sports Sciences. 2018 ; pp. 1-6.
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