Recognition, intervention, and management of antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders in children and young people: summary of NICE-SCIE guidance

S. Pilling, N. Gould, C. Whittington, C. Taylor, Stephen Scott

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders (including oppositional defiant disorder and conduct disorder) are the most common mental and behavioural problems in children and young people globally, with the frequency increasing in Western countries. In the United Kingdom 5% of mental and behavioural problems in children and young people (≤ 18 years) meet criteria for a conduct disorder, as do almost 40% of looked-after children, children who have been abused, and those on child protection or safeguarding registers. Conduct disorders are strongly associated with poor performance at school, social isolation, substance misuse, and involvement with the criminal justice system. A large proportion of children and young people with a conduct disorder will go on to be antisocial adults with impoverished and destructive lifestyles,3 especially if the conduct problems develop early, and a large minority will be diagnosed with antisocial personality disorder. Antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders often coexist with other mental health problems, place a heavy personal and economic burden on individuals and society, and involve a wide range of health, social care, educational, and criminal justice services.

This article summarises the most recent recommendations from the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) on recognising and managing antisocial behaviour and conduct disorders in children and young people. The guideline was developed jointly with the Social Care Institute for Excellence (SCIE).
Original languageEnglish
Article numberf1298
JournalBMJ
Volume346
Issue number7902
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 27 Mar 2013

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