RC structural walls under cyclic loading - Experimental verification of code overestimation of transverse reinforcement reduction potentials

Styliani Papatzani, Ioannis Giannakis, Kevin Paine, Michael Kotsovos

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

In the present study a shear wall of 1.7 m length, 1.7 m height and 0.15 m
width was designed, in compliance with the Greek Code for Reinforced Concrete (GCRC) and the Compressive Force Path method (CFP). The 1.7 m long wall, designed according to the current GCRC was constructed and tested under cyclic loading, applied in two phases. Under the first one, the specimen reached a displacement of 38.5 mm and a load of 710 kN and under the second one, the maximum displacement was 72 mm and the load 675 kN. It was concluded that the load carrying capacity of the wall was 25% greater than the design value estimated by the GCRC. The experimental value of uncracked stiffness was ¼ of the value delivered according to the GCRC. The ductility of the specimen was 3.3 in the first phase of the testing procedure (uncracked state) while in the second (first crack had occurred) was 6.2. The widest and longest crack was formed at the base of the wall, where predicted. Moreover, the steel structure used for the experiment remained flexible, notwithstanding alterations made. The comparison of the wall reinforcement designed according to the GCRC and the CFP showed that the latter method demands less amount of transverse reinforcement to achieve the same objectives as the former.

Conference

ConferenceConcrete Research: Driving Profit and Sustainability
CountryIndia
CityJalandhar
Period2/11/155/11/15

Fingerprint

Reinforced concrete
Reinforcement
Cracks
Shear walls
Steel structures
Load limits
Ductility
Stiffness
Testing
Experiments

Keywords

  • ductility
  • compressive force path
  • cyclic loading
  • transverse reinforcement
  • reinforced concrete

Cite this

Papatzani, S., Giannakis, I., Paine, K., & Kotsovos, M. (2015). RC structural walls under cyclic loading - Experimental verification of code overestimation of transverse reinforcement reduction potentials. Paper presented at Concrete Research: Driving Profit and Sustainability, Jalandhar, India.

RC structural walls under cyclic loading - Experimental verification of code overestimation of transverse reinforcement reduction potentials. / Papatzani, Styliani; Giannakis, Ioannis; Paine, Kevin; Kotsovos, Michael.

2015. Paper presented at Concrete Research: Driving Profit and Sustainability, Jalandhar, India.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Papatzani, S, Giannakis, I, Paine, K & Kotsovos, M 2015, 'RC structural walls under cyclic loading - Experimental verification of code overestimation of transverse reinforcement reduction potentials' Paper presented at Concrete Research: Driving Profit and Sustainability, Jalandhar, India, 2/11/15 - 5/11/15, .
Papatzani S, Giannakis I, Paine K, Kotsovos M. RC structural walls under cyclic loading - Experimental verification of code overestimation of transverse reinforcement reduction potentials. 2015. Paper presented at Concrete Research: Driving Profit and Sustainability, Jalandhar, India.
Papatzani, Styliani ; Giannakis, Ioannis ; Paine, Kevin ; Kotsovos, Michael. / RC structural walls under cyclic loading - Experimental verification of code overestimation of transverse reinforcement reduction potentials. Paper presented at Concrete Research: Driving Profit and Sustainability, Jalandhar, India.
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AU - Papatzani, Styliani

AU - Giannakis, Ioannis

AU - Paine, Kevin

AU - Kotsovos, Michael

PY - 2015/11

Y1 - 2015/11

N2 - In the present study a shear wall of 1.7 m length, 1.7 m height and 0.15 mwidth was designed, in compliance with the Greek Code for Reinforced Concrete (GCRC) and the Compressive Force Path method (CFP). The 1.7 m long wall, designed according to the current GCRC was constructed and tested under cyclic loading, applied in two phases. Under the first one, the specimen reached a displacement of 38.5 mm and a load of 710 kN and under the second one, the maximum displacement was 72 mm and the load 675 kN. It was concluded that the load carrying capacity of the wall was 25% greater than the design value estimated by the GCRC. The experimental value of uncracked stiffness was ¼ of the value delivered according to the GCRC. The ductility of the specimen was 3.3 in the first phase of the testing procedure (uncracked state) while in the second (first crack had occurred) was 6.2. The widest and longest crack was formed at the base of the wall, where predicted. Moreover, the steel structure used for the experiment remained flexible, notwithstanding alterations made. The comparison of the wall reinforcement designed according to the GCRC and the CFP showed that the latter method demands less amount of transverse reinforcement to achieve the same objectives as the former.

AB - In the present study a shear wall of 1.7 m length, 1.7 m height and 0.15 mwidth was designed, in compliance with the Greek Code for Reinforced Concrete (GCRC) and the Compressive Force Path method (CFP). The 1.7 m long wall, designed according to the current GCRC was constructed and tested under cyclic loading, applied in two phases. Under the first one, the specimen reached a displacement of 38.5 mm and a load of 710 kN and under the second one, the maximum displacement was 72 mm and the load 675 kN. It was concluded that the load carrying capacity of the wall was 25% greater than the design value estimated by the GCRC. The experimental value of uncracked stiffness was ¼ of the value delivered according to the GCRC. The ductility of the specimen was 3.3 in the first phase of the testing procedure (uncracked state) while in the second (first crack had occurred) was 6.2. The widest and longest crack was formed at the base of the wall, where predicted. Moreover, the steel structure used for the experiment remained flexible, notwithstanding alterations made. The comparison of the wall reinforcement designed according to the GCRC and the CFP showed that the latter method demands less amount of transverse reinforcement to achieve the same objectives as the former.

KW - ductility

KW - compressive force path

KW - cyclic loading

KW - transverse reinforcement

KW - reinforced concrete

UR - http://www.britishprecast.org/events/documents/UCC2015PrelimBrochure-eVersion.pdf

M3 - Paper

ER -