Quantifying reversibility in a phase-separating lattice gas: An analogy with self-assembly

James Grant, Robert L Jack

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)
83 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

We present dynamic measurements of a lattice gas during phase separation, which we use as an analogy for self-assembly of equilibrium ordered structures. We use two approaches to quantify the degree of reversibility of this process: First, we count events in which bonds are made and broken; second, we use correlation-response measurements and fluctuation-dissipation ratios to probe reversibility during different time intervals. We show how correlation and response functions can be related directly to microscopic (ir)reversibility and we discuss the time dependence and observable dependence of these measurements, including the role of fast and slow degrees of freedom during assembly.
Original languageEnglish
Article number021112
JournalPhysical Review E
Volume85
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2012

Fingerprint

Reversibility
Lattice Gas
Self-assembly
Analogy
self assembly
gases
Phase Separation
Time Dependence
Response Function
time dependence
Correlation Function
Dissipation
Count
Quantify
Probe
dissipation
assembly
degrees of freedom
Degree of freedom
Fluctuations

Cite this

Quantifying reversibility in a phase-separating lattice gas: An analogy with self-assembly. / Grant, James; Jack, Robert L.

In: Physical Review E, Vol. 85, No. 2, 021112, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{c5c5dfa635b047feaa3bf077cfad003e,
title = "Quantifying reversibility in a phase-separating lattice gas: An analogy with self-assembly",
abstract = "We present dynamic measurements of a lattice gas during phase separation, which we use as an analogy for self-assembly of equilibrium ordered structures. We use two approaches to quantify the degree of reversibility of this process: First, we count events in which bonds are made and broken; second, we use correlation-response measurements and fluctuation-dissipation ratios to probe reversibility during different time intervals. We show how correlation and response functions can be related directly to microscopic (ir)reversibility and we discuss the time dependence and observable dependence of these measurements, including the role of fast and slow degrees of freedom during assembly.",
author = "James Grant and Jack, {Robert L}",
year = "2012",
doi = "10.1103/PhysRevE.85.021112",
language = "English",
volume = "85",
journal = "Physical Review E",
issn = "1539-3755",
publisher = "American Physical Society",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Quantifying reversibility in a phase-separating lattice gas: An analogy with self-assembly

AU - Grant, James

AU - Jack, Robert L

PY - 2012

Y1 - 2012

N2 - We present dynamic measurements of a lattice gas during phase separation, which we use as an analogy for self-assembly of equilibrium ordered structures. We use two approaches to quantify the degree of reversibility of this process: First, we count events in which bonds are made and broken; second, we use correlation-response measurements and fluctuation-dissipation ratios to probe reversibility during different time intervals. We show how correlation and response functions can be related directly to microscopic (ir)reversibility and we discuss the time dependence and observable dependence of these measurements, including the role of fast and slow degrees of freedom during assembly.

AB - We present dynamic measurements of a lattice gas during phase separation, which we use as an analogy for self-assembly of equilibrium ordered structures. We use two approaches to quantify the degree of reversibility of this process: First, we count events in which bonds are made and broken; second, we use correlation-response measurements and fluctuation-dissipation ratios to probe reversibility during different time intervals. We show how correlation and response functions can be related directly to microscopic (ir)reversibility and we discuss the time dependence and observable dependence of these measurements, including the role of fast and slow degrees of freedom during assembly.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84857510401&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://dx.doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevE.85.021112

U2 - 10.1103/PhysRevE.85.021112

DO - 10.1103/PhysRevE.85.021112

M3 - Article

VL - 85

JO - Physical Review E

JF - Physical Review E

SN - 1539-3755

IS - 2

M1 - 021112

ER -