Quality design and environmental implications of green consumerism in remanufacturing

Wenjun Gu, Dilip Chhajed, Nicholas C. Petruzzi, Baris Yalabik

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We study quality design and the environmental consequences of green consumerism in a remanufacturing context. Specifically, a firm has the option to design a non-remanufacturable or a remanufacturable product and to specify a corresponding quality, and the design choices affect both the production costs and consumer valuations associated with the product. On the cost side, remanufacturable products cost more to produce originally, but less to remanufacture, than nonremanufacturable products cost to produce. Analogously, on the consumer side, remanufacturable products are valued more, but remanufactured products are valued less, than non-remanufacturable products are valued. Given this, we investigate the environmental consequences of designing for remanufacturability by first defining a measure of environmental impact that ultimately is a function of what is produced and how much is produced, and then applying that measure to assess the environmental impact associated with the firm's optimal strategy relative to the environmental impact associated with the firm's otherwise optimal strategy if a non-remanufacturable product were designed and produced.
LanguageEnglish
Pages55-69
JournalInternational Journal of Production Economics
Volume162
DOIs
StatusPublished - Apr 2015

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Costs
Environmental impact
Environmental quality
Design quality
Remanufacturing
Green consumerism
Optimal strategy
Production cost
Product cost

Keywords

  • Sustainability
  • Product design
  • Quality
  • Green consumerism
  • Remanufacturing
  • Environmental friendliness

Cite this

Quality design and environmental implications of green consumerism in remanufacturing. / Gu, Wenjun; Chhajed, Dilip; Petruzzi, Nicholas C.; Yalabik, Baris.

In: International Journal of Production Economics, Vol. 162, 04.2015, p. 55-69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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