Psychological therapies (remotely delivered) for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents

Emma Fisher, Emily Law, Joanne Dudeney, Christopher Eccleston, Tonya M. Palermo

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background This is the first update of a review published in 2015, Issue 1. Chronic pain is common during childhood and adolescence and is associated with negative outcomes, such as increased severity of pain, reduced function, and low mood. Psychological therapies, traditionally delivered face-to-face with a therapist, are efficacious at reducing pain intensity and disability. To address barriers to treatment access, such as distance and cost of treatment, technology is being used to deliver these psychological therapies remotely. Therapies delivered remotely, such as via the Internet, computer-based programmes, and smartphone applications, can be used to deliver treatment to children and adolescents with chronic pain. Objectives To determine the efficacy of psychological therapies delivered remotely compared to waiting list, treatment as usual, or active control treatments, for the management of chronic pain in children and adolescents. Search methods We searched four databases (CENTRAL,MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO) frominception toMay 2018 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of remotely-delivered psychological interventions for children and adolescents with chronic pain.We searched for chronic pain conditions including, but not exclusive to, headache, recurrent abdominal pain, musculoskeletal pain, and neuropathic pain. We also searched online trial registries, reference sections, and citations of included studies for potential trials. Selection criteria We included RCTs that investigated the efficacy of a psychological therapy delivered remotely via technology in comparison to an active, treatment as usual, or waiting-list control.We considered blended treatments, which used a combination of technology and up to 30% face-to-face interaction. Interventions had to be delivered primarily via technology to be included, and we excluded interventions delivered via telephone. We included studies that delivered interventions to children and adolescents (up to 18 years of age) with a chronic pain condition or where chronic pain was a primary symptom of their condition (e.g. juvenile arthritis). We included studies that reported 10 or more participants in each comparator arm, at each extraction point.

Original languageEnglish
Article numberCD011118
JournalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Volume2019
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2 Apr 2019

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology (medical)

Cite this

Psychological therapies (remotely delivered) for the management of chronic and recurrent pain in children and adolescents. / Fisher, Emma; Law, Emily; Dudeney, Joanne; Eccleston, Christopher; Palermo, Tonya M.

In: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Vol. 2019, No. 4, CD011118, 02.04.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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abstract = "Background This is the first update of a review published in 2015, Issue 1. Chronic pain is common during childhood and adolescence and is associated with negative outcomes, such as increased severity of pain, reduced function, and low mood. Psychological therapies, traditionally delivered face-to-face with a therapist, are efficacious at reducing pain intensity and disability. To address barriers to treatment access, such as distance and cost of treatment, technology is being used to deliver these psychological therapies remotely. Therapies delivered remotely, such as via the Internet, computer-based programmes, and smartphone applications, can be used to deliver treatment to children and adolescents with chronic pain. Objectives To determine the efficacy of psychological therapies delivered remotely compared to waiting list, treatment as usual, or active control treatments, for the management of chronic pain in children and adolescents. Search methods We searched four databases (CENTRAL,MEDLINE, Embase, and PsycINFO) frominception toMay 2018 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of remotely-delivered psychological interventions for children and adolescents with chronic pain.We searched for chronic pain conditions including, but not exclusive to, headache, recurrent abdominal pain, musculoskeletal pain, and neuropathic pain. We also searched online trial registries, reference sections, and citations of included studies for potential trials. Selection criteria We included RCTs that investigated the efficacy of a psychological therapy delivered remotely via technology in comparison to an active, treatment as usual, or waiting-list control.We considered blended treatments, which used a combination of technology and up to 30{\%} face-to-face interaction. Interventions had to be delivered primarily via technology to be included, and we excluded interventions delivered via telephone. We included studies that delivered interventions to children and adolescents (up to 18 years of age) with a chronic pain condition or where chronic pain was a primary symptom of their condition (e.g. juvenile arthritis). We included studies that reported 10 or more participants in each comparator arm, at each extraction point.",
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