Psychological predictors of health anxiety and pain in ambulatory presentations in a hospital emergency department

Hannah Parker, Edward Carlton, Jo Daniels, Sophie Harris

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

2 Citations (SciVal)
64 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Abstract Background: Health anxiety in attendees of out-patient medical clinics is well established; however, there has been a lack of research into health anxiety within emergency settings. Aims: This study explored the prevalence of health anxiety in ambulatory presentations in a tertiary emergency department (ED) as well as the factors associated with pain and health anxiety in this setting. Method: A cross-sectional questionnaire design was used to gather data from adult ED ambulatory attendees across a 4-day sampling period to assess psychological and physical health variables. Number of attendances to ED over the previous 12 months was accessed through healthcare records. Results: Of the final sample (n = 106), 77%were white British, 54%were male, and 14%presented with severe health anxiety as measured by the Short Health Anxiety Inventory (≥18). Participants with pre-existing health conditions had significantly higher levels of health anxiety (M = 12.36, SE = 1.59) compared with those without (M = 7.79, SE = 0.66). Stepwise multiple regression analyses identified anxiety sensitivity and pain catastrophizing as significant independent predictors of health anxiety, explaining 51%of the variance in health anxiety. Pain catastrophizing was also a significant independent predictor of pain level, accounting for 20%of the variance. Conclusion: This study provides insight into the prevalence of health anxiety in ED ambulatory presentations and key psychological predictors of health anxiety and pain. This has implications for treatment in an ED setting whereby patients may benefit from referral to medical psychology or mental health services.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)11-20
Number of pages10
JournalBehavioural and Cognitive Psychotherapy
Volume51
Issue number1
Early online date26 Aug 2022
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Jan 2023

Bibliographical note

Publisher Copyright:
© 2023 Cambridge University Press. All rights reserved.

Keywords

  • Keywords: health anxiety
  • health services
  • pain
  • safety-seeking behaviours

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology

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