Prudence and financial self-regulation in credit unions in Northern Ireland

J. Forker, A.M. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Credit unions in Northern Ireland are subject to a unique combination of statutory oversight and self-regulation. This paper investigates the association between prudence and the monitoring of financial ratios by credit union trade associations. We find that compliance with the mandated level of capital reserves is uniformly high, regardless of the existence or extent of self-regulation. However, after controlling for cross-sectional differences in profitability, age, size, growth and common bond type a positive association exists between self-regulation and financial ratios measuring prudence and loan book quality. These findings have policy implications for the regulation of credit unions in Northern Ireland and elsewhere regarding potential regulatory cost savings from reliance on self-regulation provided by trade associations.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)221-234
Number of pages14
JournalBritish Accounting Review
Volume44
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2012

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Self-regulation
Northern Ireland
Credit unions
Prudence
Financial ratios
Trade associations
Profitability
Monitoring
Loans
Oversight
Cost savings
Regulatory costs
Policy implications

Cite this

Prudence and financial self-regulation in credit unions in Northern Ireland. / Forker, J.; Ward, A.M.

In: British Accounting Review, Vol. 44, No. 4, 12.2012, p. 221-234.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Forker, J. ; Ward, A.M. / Prudence and financial self-regulation in credit unions in Northern Ireland. In: British Accounting Review. 2012 ; Vol. 44, No. 4. pp. 221-234.
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