Processing and properties of porous piezoelectric materials with high hydrostatic figures of merit

C R Bowen, A Perry, A C F Lewis, H Kara

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

103 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Porous piezoelectric materials are of interest for applications such as low frequency hydrophones. This is due to their high hydrostatic figures of merit and low sound velocity, which leads to reduced acoustic impedance and enhanced coupling with water or biological tissue. A wide variety of methods are available to produce porous structures such as using reticulated polymer foams or volatile additives which are burnt out during the sintering process (e.g. polymer spheres). Each processing technique and additive produces its own distinctive microstructure, particularly in terms of pore size, morphology and porosity volume fraction. The aim of this paper is to manufacture a variety of porous microstructures and relate the structures to measured hydrostatic figures of merit. © 2003 Elsevier Ltd.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)541-545
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the European Ceramic Society
Volume24
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2004

Fingerprint

Piezoelectric materials
Porous materials
Polymers
Hydrophones
Microstructure
Acoustic impedance
Acoustic wave velocity
Processing
Pore size
Foams
Volume fraction
Sintering
Porosity
Tissue
Water

Keywords

  • Hydrophones
  • Pore size
  • Acoustic wave velocity
  • Porosity
  • Tissue
  • Foams
  • Porous materials
  • Microstructure
  • Sintering
  • Acoustic impedance
  • Morphology
  • Piezoelectric materials
  • Polymers
  • Volume fraction

Cite this

Processing and properties of porous piezoelectric materials with high hydrostatic figures of merit. / Bowen, C R; Perry, A; Lewis, A C F; Kara, H.

In: Journal of the European Ceramic Society, Vol. 24, No. 2, 2004, p. 541-545.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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