Predicting self-rated mental and physical health

the contributions of subjective socioeconomic status and personal relative deprivation

Mitchell J Callan, Hyunji Kim, William J. Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

87 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS) and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD) relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people's perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others) and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints). Across six studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES), with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4-6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability) or response biases between the measures.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1415
JournalFrontiers in Psychology
Volume6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Sep 2015

Fingerprint

Social Class
Mental Health
Health
Psychometrics
Population

Keywords

  • Journal Article

Cite this

Predicting self-rated mental and physical health : the contributions of subjective socioeconomic status and personal relative deprivation. / Callan, Mitchell J; Kim, Hyunji; Matthews, William J.

In: Frontiers in Psychology, Vol. 6, 22.09.2015, p. 1415.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{afb4885e783949678a08b09dd3c9aaf7,
title = "Predicting self-rated mental and physical health: the contributions of subjective socioeconomic status and personal relative deprivation",
abstract = "Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS) and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD) relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people's perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others) and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints). Across six studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES), with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4-6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability) or response biases between the measures.",
keywords = "Journal Article",
author = "Callan, {Mitchell J} and Hyunji Kim and Matthews, {William J.}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "22",
doi = "10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01415",
language = "English",
volume = "6",
pages = "1415",
journal = "Frontiers in Psychology: Personality and Social Psychology",
issn = "1664-1078",
publisher = "Frontiers Media S.A.",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Predicting self-rated mental and physical health

T2 - the contributions of subjective socioeconomic status and personal relative deprivation

AU - Callan, Mitchell J

AU - Kim, Hyunji

AU - Matthews, William J.

PY - 2015/9/22

Y1 - 2015/9/22

N2 - Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS) and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD) relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people's perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others) and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints). Across six studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES), with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4-6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability) or response biases between the measures.

AB - Lower subjective socioeconomic status (SSS) and higher personal relative deprivation (PRD) relate to poorer health. Both constructs concern people's perceived relative social position, but they differ in their emphasis on the reference groups people use to determine their comparative disadvantage (national population vs. similar others) and the importance of resentment that may arise from such adverse comparisons. We investigated the relative utility of SSS and PRD as predictors of self-rated physical and mental health (e.g., self-rated health, stress, health complaints). Across six studies, self-rated physical and mental health were on the whole better predicted by measures of PRD than by SSS while controlling for objective socioeconomic status (SES), with SSS rarely contributing unique variance over and above PRD and SES. Studies 4-6 discount the possibility that the superiority of PRD over SSS in predicting health is due to psychometric differences (e.g., reliability) or response biases between the measures.

KW - Journal Article

UR - https://doi.org/10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01415

U2 - 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01415

DO - 10.3389/fpsyg.2015.01415

M3 - Article

VL - 6

SP - 1415

JO - Frontiers in Psychology: Personality and Social Psychology

JF - Frontiers in Psychology: Personality and Social Psychology

SN - 1664-1078

ER -