Pre-Exercise Breakfast Ingestion versus Extended Overnight Fasting Increases Postprandial Glucose Flux after Exercise in Healthy Men: Pre-exercise feeding and postprandial glucose flux

Robert M Edinburgh, Aaron Hengist, Harry A Smith, Rebecca L Travers, Francoise Koumanov, James A Betts, Dylan Thompson, Jean-Philippe Walhin, Gareth A Wallis, D Lee Hamilton, Emma J Stevenson, Kevin D Tipton, Javier T Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIMS: To characterize postprandial glucose flux after exercise in the fed versus overnight fasted-state and to investigate potential underlying mechanisms.

METHODS: In a randomized order, twelve men underwent breakfast-rest (BR; 3 h semi-recumbent), breakfast-exercise (BE; 2 h semi-recumbent before 60-min of cycling (50% peak power output) and overnight fasted-exercise (FE; as per BE omitting breakfast) trials. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was completed post-exercise (post-rest on BR). Dual stable isotope tracers ([U-13C] glucose ingestion and [6,6-2H2] glucose infusion) and muscle biopsies were combined to assess postprandial plasma glucose kinetics and intramuscular signaling, respectively. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding (I-FABP) concentrations were determined as a marker of intestinal damage.

RESULTS: Breakfast before exercise increased post-exercise plasma glucose disposal rates during the OGTT, from 44 g•120 min-1 in FE [35 to 53 g•120 min-1] (mean [normalized 95% CI]) to 73 g•120 min-1 in BE [55 to 90 g•120 min-1; p = 0.01]. This higher plasma glucose disposal rate was, however, offset by increased plasma glucose appearance rates (principally OGTT-derived), resulting in a glycemic response that did not differ between BE and FE (p = 0.11). Plasma I-FABP concentrations during exercise were 264 pg•mL-1 [196 to 332 pg•mL-1] lower in BE versus FE (p = 0.01).

CONCLUSION: Breakfast before exercise increases post-exercise postprandial plasma glucose disposal, which is offset (primarily) by increased appearance rates of orally-ingested glucose. Therefore, metabolic responses to fed-state exercise cannot be readily inferred from studies conducted in a fasted state.

LanguageEnglish
Article number00163
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism
Early online date14 Aug 2018
DOIs
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Aug 2018

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Breakfast
Fasting
Eating
Exercise
Glucose
Glucose Tolerance Test
Isotopes
Fatty Acids
Biopsy
Muscles

Keywords

  • Breakfast
  • Exercise
  • Insulin sensitivity
  • Glycemia
  • Metabolism

Cite this

@article{1aa88e1f6ece45469246889214aa1b22,
title = "Pre-Exercise Breakfast Ingestion versus Extended Overnight Fasting Increases Postprandial Glucose Flux after Exercise in Healthy Men: Pre-exercise feeding and postprandial glucose flux",
abstract = "AIMS: To characterize postprandial glucose flux after exercise in the fed versus overnight fasted-state and to investigate potential underlying mechanisms.METHODS: In a randomized order, twelve men underwent breakfast-rest (BR; 3 h semi-recumbent), breakfast-exercise (BE; 2 h semi-recumbent before 60-min of cycling (50{\%} peak power output) and overnight fasted-exercise (FE; as per BE omitting breakfast) trials. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was completed post-exercise (post-rest on BR). Dual stable isotope tracers ([U-13C] glucose ingestion and [6,6-2H2] glucose infusion) and muscle biopsies were combined to assess postprandial plasma glucose kinetics and intramuscular signaling, respectively. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding (I-FABP) concentrations were determined as a marker of intestinal damage.RESULTS: Breakfast before exercise increased post-exercise plasma glucose disposal rates during the OGTT, from 44 g•120 min-1 in FE [35 to 53 g•120 min-1] (mean [normalized 95{\%} CI]) to 73 g•120 min-1 in BE [55 to 90 g•120 min-1; p = 0.01]. This higher plasma glucose disposal rate was, however, offset by increased plasma glucose appearance rates (principally OGTT-derived), resulting in a glycemic response that did not differ between BE and FE (p = 0.11). Plasma I-FABP concentrations during exercise were 264 pg•mL-1 [196 to 332 pg•mL-1] lower in BE versus FE (p = 0.01).CONCLUSION: Breakfast before exercise increases post-exercise postprandial plasma glucose disposal, which is offset (primarily) by increased appearance rates of orally-ingested glucose. Therefore, metabolic responses to fed-state exercise cannot be readily inferred from studies conducted in a fasted state.",
keywords = "Breakfast, Exercise, Insulin sensitivity, Glycemia, Metabolism",
author = "Edinburgh, {Robert M} and Aaron Hengist and Smith, {Harry A} and Travers, {Rebecca L} and Francoise Koumanov and Betts, {James A} and Dylan Thompson and Jean-Philippe Walhin and Wallis, {Gareth A} and Hamilton, {D Lee} and Stevenson, {Emma J} and Tipton, {Kevin D} and Gonzalez, {Javier T}",
year = "2018",
month = "8",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1152/ajpendo.00163.2018",
language = "English",
journal = "American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism",
issn = "0193-1849",
publisher = "American Physiological Society",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Pre-Exercise Breakfast Ingestion versus Extended Overnight Fasting Increases Postprandial Glucose Flux after Exercise in Healthy Men

T2 - American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism

AU - Edinburgh, Robert M

AU - Hengist, Aaron

AU - Smith, Harry A

AU - Travers, Rebecca L

AU - Koumanov, Francoise

AU - Betts, James A

AU - Thompson, Dylan

AU - Walhin, Jean-Philippe

AU - Wallis, Gareth A

AU - Hamilton, D Lee

AU - Stevenson, Emma J

AU - Tipton, Kevin D

AU - Gonzalez, Javier T

PY - 2018/8/14

Y1 - 2018/8/14

N2 - AIMS: To characterize postprandial glucose flux after exercise in the fed versus overnight fasted-state and to investigate potential underlying mechanisms.METHODS: In a randomized order, twelve men underwent breakfast-rest (BR; 3 h semi-recumbent), breakfast-exercise (BE; 2 h semi-recumbent before 60-min of cycling (50% peak power output) and overnight fasted-exercise (FE; as per BE omitting breakfast) trials. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was completed post-exercise (post-rest on BR). Dual stable isotope tracers ([U-13C] glucose ingestion and [6,6-2H2] glucose infusion) and muscle biopsies were combined to assess postprandial plasma glucose kinetics and intramuscular signaling, respectively. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding (I-FABP) concentrations were determined as a marker of intestinal damage.RESULTS: Breakfast before exercise increased post-exercise plasma glucose disposal rates during the OGTT, from 44 g•120 min-1 in FE [35 to 53 g•120 min-1] (mean [normalized 95% CI]) to 73 g•120 min-1 in BE [55 to 90 g•120 min-1; p = 0.01]. This higher plasma glucose disposal rate was, however, offset by increased plasma glucose appearance rates (principally OGTT-derived), resulting in a glycemic response that did not differ between BE and FE (p = 0.11). Plasma I-FABP concentrations during exercise were 264 pg•mL-1 [196 to 332 pg•mL-1] lower in BE versus FE (p = 0.01).CONCLUSION: Breakfast before exercise increases post-exercise postprandial plasma glucose disposal, which is offset (primarily) by increased appearance rates of orally-ingested glucose. Therefore, metabolic responses to fed-state exercise cannot be readily inferred from studies conducted in a fasted state.

AB - AIMS: To characterize postprandial glucose flux after exercise in the fed versus overnight fasted-state and to investigate potential underlying mechanisms.METHODS: In a randomized order, twelve men underwent breakfast-rest (BR; 3 h semi-recumbent), breakfast-exercise (BE; 2 h semi-recumbent before 60-min of cycling (50% peak power output) and overnight fasted-exercise (FE; as per BE omitting breakfast) trials. An oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) was completed post-exercise (post-rest on BR). Dual stable isotope tracers ([U-13C] glucose ingestion and [6,6-2H2] glucose infusion) and muscle biopsies were combined to assess postprandial plasma glucose kinetics and intramuscular signaling, respectively. Plasma intestinal fatty acid binding (I-FABP) concentrations were determined as a marker of intestinal damage.RESULTS: Breakfast before exercise increased post-exercise plasma glucose disposal rates during the OGTT, from 44 g•120 min-1 in FE [35 to 53 g•120 min-1] (mean [normalized 95% CI]) to 73 g•120 min-1 in BE [55 to 90 g•120 min-1; p = 0.01]. This higher plasma glucose disposal rate was, however, offset by increased plasma glucose appearance rates (principally OGTT-derived), resulting in a glycemic response that did not differ between BE and FE (p = 0.11). Plasma I-FABP concentrations during exercise were 264 pg•mL-1 [196 to 332 pg•mL-1] lower in BE versus FE (p = 0.01).CONCLUSION: Breakfast before exercise increases post-exercise postprandial plasma glucose disposal, which is offset (primarily) by increased appearance rates of orally-ingested glucose. Therefore, metabolic responses to fed-state exercise cannot be readily inferred from studies conducted in a fasted state.

KW - Breakfast

KW - Exercise

KW - Insulin sensitivity

KW - Glycemia

KW - Metabolism

U2 - 10.1152/ajpendo.00163.2018

DO - 10.1152/ajpendo.00163.2018

M3 - Article

JO - American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism

JF - American Journal of Physiology: Endocrinology and Metabolism

SN - 0193-1849

M1 - 00163

ER -