Post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion augments cycling capacity during short-term and overnight recovery from exhaustive exercise, compared to isocaloric glucose.

Fructose co-ingestion augments overnight recovery

Edward Gray, Thomas Green, James Betts, Javier Gonzalez

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

During short-term recovery, post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion can accelerate total glycogen repletion and augment recovery of running capacity. It is unknown if this advantage translates to cycling, or to a longer (e.g. overnight) recovery. Using two experiments, the present research investigated if post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion augments exercise capacity following 4 h (SHORT-EXPERIMENT; n=8) and 15 h (OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT; n=8) recoveries from exhaustive exercise in trained cyclists, compared to isocaloric glucose alone. In each experiment, a glycogen depleting exercise protocol was followed by a 4 h recovery, with ingestion of 1.5 or 1.2 g.kg-1.h-1 carbohydrate in SHORT-EXPERIMENT (double-blind) and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT (single-blind), respectively. Treatments were provided in a randomized order using a cross-over design. Four or fifteen hours after the glycogen depletion protocol, participants cycled to exhaustion at 70 or 65% Wmax in SHORT-EXPERIMENT and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT, respectively. In both experiments there was no difference in substrate oxidation or blood glucose and lactate concentrations between treatments during the exercise capacity test (trial effect, p > 0.05). Nevertheless, cycling capacity was greater in GLUCOSE+FRUCTOSE versus GLUCOSE-ONLY in SHORT-EXPERIMENT (28.0 ± 8.4 versus 22.8 ± 7.3 min, d = 0.65, p = 0.039) and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT (35.9 ± 10.7 versus 30.6 ± 9.2 min, d = 0.53, p = 0.026). This is the first study to demonstrate that post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion enhances cycling capacity following short-term (4 h) and overnight (15 h) recovery durations. Therefore, if multi-stage endurance athletes are ingesting glucose for rapid post-exercise recovery then fructose containing carbohydrates should be co-ingested.
Original languageEnglish
JournalInternational Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 12 Aug 2019

Keywords

  • Exercise
  • Fructose
  • Glucose
  • Metabolism
  • Nutrition

Cite this

@article{49b95b6d87804904bb21ea6f61d01b98,
title = "Post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion augments cycling capacity during short-term and overnight recovery from exhaustive exercise, compared to isocaloric glucose.: Fructose co-ingestion augments overnight recovery",
abstract = "During short-term recovery, post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion can accelerate total glycogen repletion and augment recovery of running capacity. It is unknown if this advantage translates to cycling, or to a longer (e.g. overnight) recovery. Using two experiments, the present research investigated if post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion augments exercise capacity following 4 h (SHORT-EXPERIMENT; n=8) and 15 h (OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT; n=8) recoveries from exhaustive exercise in trained cyclists, compared to isocaloric glucose alone. In each experiment, a glycogen depleting exercise protocol was followed by a 4 h recovery, with ingestion of 1.5 or 1.2 g.kg-1.h-1 carbohydrate in SHORT-EXPERIMENT (double-blind) and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT (single-blind), respectively. Treatments were provided in a randomized order using a cross-over design. Four or fifteen hours after the glycogen depletion protocol, participants cycled to exhaustion at 70 or 65{\%} Wmax in SHORT-EXPERIMENT and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT, respectively. In both experiments there was no difference in substrate oxidation or blood glucose and lactate concentrations between treatments during the exercise capacity test (trial effect, p > 0.05). Nevertheless, cycling capacity was greater in GLUCOSE+FRUCTOSE versus GLUCOSE-ONLY in SHORT-EXPERIMENT (28.0 ± 8.4 versus 22.8 ± 7.3 min, d = 0.65, p = 0.039) and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT (35.9 ± 10.7 versus 30.6 ± 9.2 min, d = 0.53, p = 0.026). This is the first study to demonstrate that post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion enhances cycling capacity following short-term (4 h) and overnight (15 h) recovery durations. Therefore, if multi-stage endurance athletes are ingesting glucose for rapid post-exercise recovery then fructose containing carbohydrates should be co-ingested.",
keywords = "Exercise, Fructose, Glucose, Metabolism, Nutrition",
author = "Edward Gray and Thomas Green and James Betts and Javier Gonzalez",
year = "2019",
month = "8",
day = "12",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism",
issn = "1526-484X",
publisher = "Human Kinetics Publishers Inc.",

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion augments cycling capacity during short-term and overnight recovery from exhaustive exercise, compared to isocaloric glucose.

T2 - Fructose co-ingestion augments overnight recovery

AU - Gray, Edward

AU - Green, Thomas

AU - Betts, James

AU - Gonzalez, Javier

PY - 2019/8/12

Y1 - 2019/8/12

N2 - During short-term recovery, post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion can accelerate total glycogen repletion and augment recovery of running capacity. It is unknown if this advantage translates to cycling, or to a longer (e.g. overnight) recovery. Using two experiments, the present research investigated if post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion augments exercise capacity following 4 h (SHORT-EXPERIMENT; n=8) and 15 h (OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT; n=8) recoveries from exhaustive exercise in trained cyclists, compared to isocaloric glucose alone. In each experiment, a glycogen depleting exercise protocol was followed by a 4 h recovery, with ingestion of 1.5 or 1.2 g.kg-1.h-1 carbohydrate in SHORT-EXPERIMENT (double-blind) and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT (single-blind), respectively. Treatments were provided in a randomized order using a cross-over design. Four or fifteen hours after the glycogen depletion protocol, participants cycled to exhaustion at 70 or 65% Wmax in SHORT-EXPERIMENT and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT, respectively. In both experiments there was no difference in substrate oxidation or blood glucose and lactate concentrations between treatments during the exercise capacity test (trial effect, p > 0.05). Nevertheless, cycling capacity was greater in GLUCOSE+FRUCTOSE versus GLUCOSE-ONLY in SHORT-EXPERIMENT (28.0 ± 8.4 versus 22.8 ± 7.3 min, d = 0.65, p = 0.039) and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT (35.9 ± 10.7 versus 30.6 ± 9.2 min, d = 0.53, p = 0.026). This is the first study to demonstrate that post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion enhances cycling capacity following short-term (4 h) and overnight (15 h) recovery durations. Therefore, if multi-stage endurance athletes are ingesting glucose for rapid post-exercise recovery then fructose containing carbohydrates should be co-ingested.

AB - During short-term recovery, post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion can accelerate total glycogen repletion and augment recovery of running capacity. It is unknown if this advantage translates to cycling, or to a longer (e.g. overnight) recovery. Using two experiments, the present research investigated if post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion augments exercise capacity following 4 h (SHORT-EXPERIMENT; n=8) and 15 h (OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT; n=8) recoveries from exhaustive exercise in trained cyclists, compared to isocaloric glucose alone. In each experiment, a glycogen depleting exercise protocol was followed by a 4 h recovery, with ingestion of 1.5 or 1.2 g.kg-1.h-1 carbohydrate in SHORT-EXPERIMENT (double-blind) and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT (single-blind), respectively. Treatments were provided in a randomized order using a cross-over design. Four or fifteen hours after the glycogen depletion protocol, participants cycled to exhaustion at 70 or 65% Wmax in SHORT-EXPERIMENT and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT, respectively. In both experiments there was no difference in substrate oxidation or blood glucose and lactate concentrations between treatments during the exercise capacity test (trial effect, p > 0.05). Nevertheless, cycling capacity was greater in GLUCOSE+FRUCTOSE versus GLUCOSE-ONLY in SHORT-EXPERIMENT (28.0 ± 8.4 versus 22.8 ± 7.3 min, d = 0.65, p = 0.039) and OVERNIGHT-EXPERIMENT (35.9 ± 10.7 versus 30.6 ± 9.2 min, d = 0.53, p = 0.026). This is the first study to demonstrate that post-exercise glucose-fructose co-ingestion enhances cycling capacity following short-term (4 h) and overnight (15 h) recovery durations. Therefore, if multi-stage endurance athletes are ingesting glucose for rapid post-exercise recovery then fructose containing carbohydrates should be co-ingested.

KW - Exercise

KW - Fructose

KW - Glucose

KW - Metabolism

KW - Nutrition

M3 - Article

JO - International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

JF - International Journal of Sport Nutrition and Exercise Metabolism

SN - 1526-484X

ER -