Pilot randomised trial of a brief intervention for comorbid substance misuse in psychiatric in-patient settings

H. L. Graham, A. Copello, E. Griffith, N. Freemantle, P. McCrone, L. Clarke, K. Walsh, C. A. Stefanidou, A. Rana, M. Birchwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Objective: This proof of principle study evaluated the effectiveness and feasibility of a brief motivational intervention, delivered in mental health in-patient settings, to improve engagement in treatment for drug and alcohol misuse. Method: A randomised controlled trial using concealed randomisation, blind, independent assessment of outcome at 3 months. Participants were 59 new adult admissions, to six acute mental health hospital units in one UK mental health service, with schizophrenia related or bipolar disorder diagnoses, users of community mental health services and also misusing alcohol and/or drugs. Participants were randomised to Brief Integrated Motivational Intervention (BIMI) with Treatment As Usual (TAU), or TAU alone. The BIMI took place over a 2-week period and encouraged participants to explore substance use and its impact on mental health. Results: Fifty-nine in-patients (BIMI n = 30; TAU n = 29) were randomised, the BIMI was associated with a 63% relative odds increase in the primary outcome engagement in treatment [OR 1.63 (95% CI 1.01-2.65; P = 0.047)], at 3 months. Qualitative interviews with staff and participants indicated that the BIMI was both feasible and acceptable. Conclusion: Mental health hospital admissions present an opportunity for brief motivational interventions focussed on substance misuse and can lead to improvements in engagement.

LanguageEnglish
Pages298-309
JournalActa Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Volume133
Issue number4
Early online date21 Nov 2015
DOIs
StatusPublished - Apr 2016

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Psychiatry
Mental Health
Psychiatric Hospitals
Alcohols
Community Mental Health Services
Therapeutics
Hospital Units
Mental Health Services
Random Allocation
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Schizophrenia
Randomized Controlled Trials
Odds Ratio
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Interviews

Keywords

  • Dual diagnosis
  • Hospital admission
  • randomised controlled trial
  • Schizophrenia
  • Substance misuse

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Pilot randomised trial of a brief intervention for comorbid substance misuse in psychiatric in-patient settings. / Graham, H. L.; Copello, A.; Griffith, E.; Freemantle, N.; McCrone, P.; Clarke, L.; Walsh, K.; Stefanidou, C. A.; Rana, A.; Birchwood, M.

In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, Vol. 133, No. 4, 04.2016, p. 298-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Graham, HL, Copello, A, Griffith, E, Freemantle, N, McCrone, P, Clarke, L, Walsh, K, Stefanidou, CA, Rana, A & Birchwood, M 2016, 'Pilot randomised trial of a brief intervention for comorbid substance misuse in psychiatric in-patient settings' Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, vol. 133, no. 4, pp. 298-309. https://doi.org/10.1111/acps.12530
Graham, H. L. ; Copello, A. ; Griffith, E. ; Freemantle, N. ; McCrone, P. ; Clarke, L. ; Walsh, K. ; Stefanidou, C. A. ; Rana, A. ; Birchwood, M. / Pilot randomised trial of a brief intervention for comorbid substance misuse in psychiatric in-patient settings. In: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica. 2016 ; Vol. 133, No. 4. pp. 298-309.
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