Photooxidation-induced changes in optical, electrochemical, and photochemical properties of humic substances

Charles M. Sharpless, Michael Aeschbacher, Sarah E. Page, Jannis Wenk, Michael Sander, Kristopher McNeill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Two aquatic fulvic acids and one soil humic acid were irradiated to examine the resulting changes in the redox and photochemical properties of the humic substances (HS), the relationship between these changes, and their relationship to changes in the optical properties. For all HS, irradiation caused photooxidation, as shown by decreasing electron donating capacities. Photooxidation was accompanied by decreases in specific UV absorbance and increases in the E2/E3 ratio (254 nm absorbance divided by that at 365 nm). In contrast, photooxidation had little effect on the samples' electron accepting capacities. The coupled changes in optical and redox properties for the different HS suggest that phenols are an important determinant of aquatic HS optical properties and that quinones may play a more important role in soil HS. Apparent quantum yields of H2O2, ·OH, and triplet HS decreased with photooxidation, thus demonstrating selective destruction of HS photosensitizing chromophores. In contrast, singlet oxygen (1O 2) quantum yields increased, which is ascribed to either decreased 1O2 quenching within the HS microenvironment or the presence of a pool of photostable sensitizers. The photochemical properties show clear trends with SUVA and E2/E3, but the trends differ substantially between aquatic and soil HS. Importantly, photooxidation produces a relationship between the 1O2 quantum yield and E2/E3 that differs distinctly from that observed with untreated HS. This finding suggests that there may be watershed-specific correlations between HS chemical and optical properties that reflect the dominant processes controlling the HS character.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)2688-2696
Number of pages9
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume48
Issue number5
Early online date2 Jan 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Mar 2014

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Humic Substances
Photooxidation
photooxidation
humic substance
Quantum yield
optical property
Optical properties
absorbance
Soils
electron
soil
Quinones
Singlet Oxygen
Electrons
Phenols
fulvic acid
Chromophores
humic acid
Watersheds
phenol

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Photooxidation-induced changes in optical, electrochemical, and photochemical properties of humic substances. / Sharpless, Charles M.; Aeschbacher, Michael; Page, Sarah E.; Wenk, Jannis; Sander, Michael; McNeill, Kristopher.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 48, No. 5, 04.03.2014, p. 2688-2696.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Sharpless, Charles M. ; Aeschbacher, Michael ; Page, Sarah E. ; Wenk, Jannis ; Sander, Michael ; McNeill, Kristopher. / Photooxidation-induced changes in optical, electrochemical, and photochemical properties of humic substances. In: Environmental Science and Technology. 2014 ; Vol. 48, No. 5. pp. 2688-2696.
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