Origin of stem cells in organogenesis

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Abstract

The development of individual organs in animal embryos involves the formation of tissue-specific stem cells that sustain cell renewal of their own tissue for the lifetime of the organism. Although details of their origin are not always known, tissue-specific stem cells usually share the expression of key transcription factors with cells of the embryonic rudiment from which they arise, and are probably in a similar developmental state. On the other hand, the isolation of pluripotent stem cells from the postnatal organism has encouraged the formulation of models of embryonic and postnatal development that are at variance with the conventional ones. Possible explanations for the existence of such cells, and the issue of whether they also exist in vivo, are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1498-1501
Number of pages4
JournalScience
Volume332
Issue number5907
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Dec 2008

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organogenesis
stem cells
personal development
postnatal development
organisms
cells
embryo (animal)
embryogenesis
transcription factors
tissues

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Origin of stem cells in organogenesis. / Slack, Jonathan.

In: Science, Vol. 332, No. 5907, 05.12.2008, p. 1498-1501.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Slack, Jonathan. / Origin of stem cells in organogenesis. In: Science. 2008 ; Vol. 332, No. 5907. pp. 1498-1501.
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