On the hourly contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to the atmospheric electric field in the Antarctic during December 1992

Martin Füllekrug, A C Fraser-Smith, E A Bering, A A Few

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

ELF magnetic field measurements from 10 to 135 Hz at Arrival Heights, Antarctica, are used as a proxy measure of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity. Simultaneous hourly recordings of the atmospheric electric field on the surface of the Earth at South Pole during December 1992 make possible a detailed comparison between global cloud-to-ground lightning activity and the atmospheric electric field. Although the mean diurnal variation of the ELF magnetic field anti the atmospheric electric field exhibit a remarkable similarity in shape and phase, the hourly departures from their mean diurnal variations are poorly correlated. We quantify the variability of the atmospheric electric field which can be explained by global cloud-to-ground lightning activity through linear regression analysis. To estimate an accuracy of this method, it is applied to simultaneous measurements of the ELF magnetic field at Sondrestromfjord, Greenland, for comparison. The resulting hourly contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to the atmospheric electric field in the Antarctic during December 1992 is similar to 40 +/- 10%, and the contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to hourly departures from the mean diurnal variation of the atmospheric electric field is similar to 25 +/- 10%.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)745-750
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics
Volume61
Issue number10
Publication statusPublished - 1999

Fingerprint

cloud to ground lightning
lightning
electric field
electric fields
diurnal variations
diurnal variation
magnetic field
magnetic fields
Greenland
Antarctic regions
arrivals
regression analysis
poles
recording
estimates

Keywords

  • Circuit
  • Resonances
  • Earth
  • Thermometer

Cite this

@article{9fe97a16bfb6420a8667e11c28e634a5,
title = "On the hourly contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to the atmospheric electric field in the Antarctic during December 1992",
abstract = "ELF magnetic field measurements from 10 to 135 Hz at Arrival Heights, Antarctica, are used as a proxy measure of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity. Simultaneous hourly recordings of the atmospheric electric field on the surface of the Earth at South Pole during December 1992 make possible a detailed comparison between global cloud-to-ground lightning activity and the atmospheric electric field. Although the mean diurnal variation of the ELF magnetic field anti the atmospheric electric field exhibit a remarkable similarity in shape and phase, the hourly departures from their mean diurnal variations are poorly correlated. We quantify the variability of the atmospheric electric field which can be explained by global cloud-to-ground lightning activity through linear regression analysis. To estimate an accuracy of this method, it is applied to simultaneous measurements of the ELF magnetic field at Sondrestromfjord, Greenland, for comparison. The resulting hourly contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to the atmospheric electric field in the Antarctic during December 1992 is similar to 40 +/- 10{\%}, and the contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to hourly departures from the mean diurnal variation of the atmospheric electric field is similar to 25 +/- 10{\%}.",
keywords = "Circuit, Resonances, Earth, Thermometer",
author = "Martin F{\"u}llekrug and Fraser-Smith, {A C} and Bering, {E A} and Few, {A A}",
year = "1999",
language = "English",
volume = "61",
pages = "745--750",
journal = "Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics",
issn = "1364-6826",
publisher = "Elsevier",
number = "10",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - On the hourly contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to the atmospheric electric field in the Antarctic during December 1992

AU - Füllekrug, Martin

AU - Fraser-Smith, A C

AU - Bering, E A

AU - Few, A A

PY - 1999

Y1 - 1999

N2 - ELF magnetic field measurements from 10 to 135 Hz at Arrival Heights, Antarctica, are used as a proxy measure of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity. Simultaneous hourly recordings of the atmospheric electric field on the surface of the Earth at South Pole during December 1992 make possible a detailed comparison between global cloud-to-ground lightning activity and the atmospheric electric field. Although the mean diurnal variation of the ELF magnetic field anti the atmospheric electric field exhibit a remarkable similarity in shape and phase, the hourly departures from their mean diurnal variations are poorly correlated. We quantify the variability of the atmospheric electric field which can be explained by global cloud-to-ground lightning activity through linear regression analysis. To estimate an accuracy of this method, it is applied to simultaneous measurements of the ELF magnetic field at Sondrestromfjord, Greenland, for comparison. The resulting hourly contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to the atmospheric electric field in the Antarctic during December 1992 is similar to 40 +/- 10%, and the contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to hourly departures from the mean diurnal variation of the atmospheric electric field is similar to 25 +/- 10%.

AB - ELF magnetic field measurements from 10 to 135 Hz at Arrival Heights, Antarctica, are used as a proxy measure of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity. Simultaneous hourly recordings of the atmospheric electric field on the surface of the Earth at South Pole during December 1992 make possible a detailed comparison between global cloud-to-ground lightning activity and the atmospheric electric field. Although the mean diurnal variation of the ELF magnetic field anti the atmospheric electric field exhibit a remarkable similarity in shape and phase, the hourly departures from their mean diurnal variations are poorly correlated. We quantify the variability of the atmospheric electric field which can be explained by global cloud-to-ground lightning activity through linear regression analysis. To estimate an accuracy of this method, it is applied to simultaneous measurements of the ELF magnetic field at Sondrestromfjord, Greenland, for comparison. The resulting hourly contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to the atmospheric electric field in the Antarctic during December 1992 is similar to 40 +/- 10%, and the contribution of global cloud-to-ground lightning activity to hourly departures from the mean diurnal variation of the atmospheric electric field is similar to 25 +/- 10%.

KW - Circuit

KW - Resonances

KW - Earth

KW - Thermometer

M3 - Article

VL - 61

SP - 745

EP - 750

JO - Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics

JF - Journal of Atmospheric and Solar-Terrestrial Physics

SN - 1364-6826

IS - 10

ER -