Obsessive-compulsive disorder in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: What does self-report with the OCI-R tell us?

Cadman T, Spain Deborah, Patrick Johnston, Ailsa Russell, David Mataix-Cols, MIchael Craig, Quinton Deeley, Dene Robertson, Clodagh Murphy, Nicola Gillan, C.Ellie Wilson, Maria Mendez, Christina Ecker, Eileen Daly, James Findon, Karen Glaser, MRC AIMS Consortium, Francesca Happe, Declan Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Background: Little is known about the symptom profile of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in individuals who have autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is also unknown whether self-report questionnaires are useful in measuring OCD in ASD.

Aims: To describe the symptom profiles of adults with ASD, OCD, and ASD+OCD using the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory – Revised (OCI-R), and to assess the utility of the OCI-R as a screening measure in a high-functioning adult ASD sample.

Method: Individuals with ASD (n=171), OCD (n=108), ASD+OCD (n=54) and control participants (n=92) completed the OCI-R.

Results: Individuals with ASD+OCD reported significantly higher levels of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than those with ASD alone. OCD symptoms were not significantly correlated with core ASD repetitive behaviours as measured on the ADI-R or ADOS-G. The OCI-R showed good psychometric properties and corresponded well with clinician diagnosis of OCD. ROC analysis suggested cut-offs for OCI-R Total and Checking scores that discriminated well between ASD + versus –OCD, and fairly well between ASD-alone and OCD-alone.

Conclusions: OCD manifests separately from ASD and is characterised by a different profile of repetitive thoughts and behaviours. The OCI-R appears to be useful as a screening tool in the ASD adult population.
LanguageEnglish
Pages477-485
JournalAutism Research
Volume8
Issue number5
Early online date7 Feb 2015
DOIs
StatusPublished - Oct 2015

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Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder
Self Report
Equipment and Supplies
Autism Spectrum Disorder
Psychometrics
ROC Curve

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Obsessive-compulsive disorder in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder : What does self-report with the OCI-R tell us? / MRC AIMS Consortium; Happe, Francesca; Murphy, Declan.

In: Autism Research, Vol. 8, No. 5, 10.2015, p. 477-485.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

MRC AIMS Consortium ; Happe, Francesca ; Murphy, Declan. / Obsessive-compulsive disorder in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder : What does self-report with the OCI-R tell us?. In: Autism Research. 2015 ; Vol. 8, No. 5. pp. 477-485
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abstract = "Background: Little is known about the symptom profile of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in individuals who have autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is also unknown whether self-report questionnaires are useful in measuring OCD in ASD. Aims: To describe the symptom profiles of adults with ASD, OCD, and ASD+OCD using the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory – Revised (OCI-R), and to assess the utility of the OCI-R as a screening measure in a high-functioning adult ASD sample. Method: Individuals with ASD (n=171), OCD (n=108), ASD+OCD (n=54) and control participants (n=92) completed the OCI-R. Results: Individuals with ASD+OCD reported significantly higher levels of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than those with ASD alone. OCD symptoms were not significantly correlated with core ASD repetitive behaviours as measured on the ADI-R or ADOS-G. The OCI-R showed good psychometric properties and corresponded well with clinician diagnosis of OCD. ROC analysis suggested cut-offs for OCI-R Total and Checking scores that discriminated well between ASD + versus –OCD, and fairly well between ASD-alone and OCD-alone.Conclusions: OCD manifests separately from ASD and is characterised by a different profile of repetitive thoughts and behaviours. The OCI-R appears to be useful as a screening tool in the ASD adult population.",
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AU - Mataix-Cols,David

AU - Craig,MIchael

AU - Deeley,Quinton

AU - Robertson,Dene

AU - Murphy,Clodagh

AU - Gillan,Nicola

AU - Wilson,C.Ellie

AU - Mendez,Maria

AU - Ecker,Christina

AU - Daly,Eileen

AU - Findon,James

AU - Glaser,Karen

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AU - Murphy,Declan

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N2 - Background: Little is known about the symptom profile of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in individuals who have autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is also unknown whether self-report questionnaires are useful in measuring OCD in ASD. Aims: To describe the symptom profiles of adults with ASD, OCD, and ASD+OCD using the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory – Revised (OCI-R), and to assess the utility of the OCI-R as a screening measure in a high-functioning adult ASD sample. Method: Individuals with ASD (n=171), OCD (n=108), ASD+OCD (n=54) and control participants (n=92) completed the OCI-R. Results: Individuals with ASD+OCD reported significantly higher levels of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than those with ASD alone. OCD symptoms were not significantly correlated with core ASD repetitive behaviours as measured on the ADI-R or ADOS-G. The OCI-R showed good psychometric properties and corresponded well with clinician diagnosis of OCD. ROC analysis suggested cut-offs for OCI-R Total and Checking scores that discriminated well between ASD + versus –OCD, and fairly well between ASD-alone and OCD-alone.Conclusions: OCD manifests separately from ASD and is characterised by a different profile of repetitive thoughts and behaviours. The OCI-R appears to be useful as a screening tool in the ASD adult population.

AB - Background: Little is known about the symptom profile of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in individuals who have autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is also unknown whether self-report questionnaires are useful in measuring OCD in ASD. Aims: To describe the symptom profiles of adults with ASD, OCD, and ASD+OCD using the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory – Revised (OCI-R), and to assess the utility of the OCI-R as a screening measure in a high-functioning adult ASD sample. Method: Individuals with ASD (n=171), OCD (n=108), ASD+OCD (n=54) and control participants (n=92) completed the OCI-R. Results: Individuals with ASD+OCD reported significantly higher levels of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than those with ASD alone. OCD symptoms were not significantly correlated with core ASD repetitive behaviours as measured on the ADI-R or ADOS-G. The OCI-R showed good psychometric properties and corresponded well with clinician diagnosis of OCD. ROC analysis suggested cut-offs for OCI-R Total and Checking scores that discriminated well between ASD + versus –OCD, and fairly well between ASD-alone and OCD-alone.Conclusions: OCD manifests separately from ASD and is characterised by a different profile of repetitive thoughts and behaviours. The OCI-R appears to be useful as a screening tool in the ASD adult population.

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