Obsessive-compulsive disorder in adults with high-functioning autism spectrum disorder: What does self-report with the OCI-R tell us?

MRC AIMS Consortium, Francesca Happe, Declan Murphy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

30 Citations (Scopus)
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Abstract

Background: Little is known about the symptom profile of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) in individuals who have autism spectrum disorders (ASD). It is also unknown whether self-report questionnaires are useful in measuring OCD in ASD.

Aims: To describe the symptom profiles of adults with ASD, OCD, and ASD+OCD using the Obsessive Compulsive Inventory – Revised (OCI-R), and to assess the utility of the OCI-R as a screening measure in a high-functioning adult ASD sample.

Method: Individuals with ASD (n=171), OCD (n=108), ASD+OCD (n=54) and control participants (n=92) completed the OCI-R.

Results: Individuals with ASD+OCD reported significantly higher levels of obsessive-compulsive symptoms than those with ASD alone. OCD symptoms were not significantly correlated with core ASD repetitive behaviours as measured on the ADI-R or ADOS-G. The OCI-R showed good psychometric properties and corresponded well with clinician diagnosis of OCD. ROC analysis suggested cut-offs for OCI-R Total and Checking scores that discriminated well between ASD + versus –OCD, and fairly well between ASD-alone and OCD-alone.

Conclusions: OCD manifests separately from ASD and is characterised by a different profile of repetitive thoughts and behaviours. The OCI-R appears to be useful as a screening tool in the ASD adult population.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)477-485
JournalAutism Research
Volume8
Issue number5
Early online date7 Feb 2015
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2015

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