Novel self-healing systems

Expanding and inhibited healing agents

S. I. Rae, I. P. Bond, R. S. Trask, D. F. Wass

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

A new approach to self-healing systems is presented that aims to overcome the inherent drawbacks of conventional liquid resin based healing systems within composites. Finite embedded systems offer limited healing potential for small volume delaminations and as such cannot effectively heal large damage volumes often associated with shear damaged sandwich panel structures or debonding between skin and core. An expanding polymer based approach aims to overcome such limitations. The mechanical and physical properties of a prepared polyepoxide foam are investigated and how the inclusion of a carbon fibre reinforcement within the foam affects processability and performance. The healing efficiency of different polymer foams to heal damaged structures is also investigated. A secondary investigation is also presented that aimed to overcome the drawbacks associated with the requirement for stoichiometric mixing of two part healing agents, or for healing agent to come into direct contact with a catalyst embedded within the matrix material. Different approaches were taken to develop a self-healing system that once deployed required no additional mixing or stimuli for healing to occur.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014
PublisherAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME)
Volume1
ISBN (Print)9780791846148
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2014
EventASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014 - Newport, USA United States
Duration: 8 Sep 201410 Sep 2014

Conference

ConferenceASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014
CountryUSA United States
CityNewport
Period8/09/1410/09/14

Fingerprint

Foams
Polymers
Debonding
Fiber reinforced materials
Delamination
Embedded systems
Carbon fibers
Skin
Resins
Physical properties
Mechanical properties
Catalysts
Composite materials
Liquids
carbon fiber

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomaterials
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

Cite this

Rae, S. I., Bond, I. P., Trask, R. S., & Wass, D. F. (2014). Novel self-healing systems: Expanding and inhibited healing agents. In ASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014 (Vol. 1). American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). https://doi.org/10.1115/SMASIS20147637

Novel self-healing systems : Expanding and inhibited healing agents. / Rae, S. I.; Bond, I. P.; Trask, R. S.; Wass, D. F.

ASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014. Vol. 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2014.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Rae, SI, Bond, IP, Trask, RS & Wass, DF 2014, Novel self-healing systems: Expanding and inhibited healing agents. in ASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014. vol. 1, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), ASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014, Newport, USA United States, 8/09/14. https://doi.org/10.1115/SMASIS20147637
Rae SI, Bond IP, Trask RS, Wass DF. Novel self-healing systems: Expanding and inhibited healing agents. In ASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014. Vol. 1. American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME). 2014 https://doi.org/10.1115/SMASIS20147637
Rae, S. I. ; Bond, I. P. ; Trask, R. S. ; Wass, D. F. / Novel self-healing systems : Expanding and inhibited healing agents. ASME 2014 Conference on Smart Materials, Adaptive Structures and Intelligent Systems, SMASIS 2014. Vol. 1 American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME), 2014.
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