Novel catalyst systems for deNOx

David Mcclymont, Stan Kolaczkowski, Kieran C Molloy, Serpil Awdry

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Technologies are being developed to enable a feed of biomass to be gasified, producing a fuel that has a high CO and H2 content; which may then be used in stationary gas engines to supply energy in the form of electricity and heat. This creates an opportunity to develop more effective, economic solutions for the clean-up of emissions from such engines, in line with the European Waste Incineration Directive (WID).

Ammonia or urea selective catalytic reduction (NH3-SCR) is the current industrial practice for NOx control from stationary sources. NOx Storage and Reduction (NSR) processes, where NOx species are ‘trapped’ before they are subsequently reduced through alternate lean and rich-burn cycles, also use ammonia as the reductant of choice.

Hydrogen may also be used as a reductant in these processes, and as it is already present in the application of interest, it negates the need for the additional chemicals and their associated costs. The development of a catalyst material which can facilitate the reduction of NOx using hydrogen is the primary aim of this research, and recent work has focused on investigation of the performance of various catalysts in these processes. It may also be possible to combine the SCR and NSR processes, using hydrogen as the reductant, to create a hybrid design further improving the efficiency of the NOx treatment system.

Conference

ConferenceIChemE Catalysis for Energy Meeting
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityUniversity of Birmingham
Period11/12/12 → …

Fingerprint

Thyristors
Hydrogen
Catalysts
Ammonia
Gas engines
Selective catalytic reduction
Waste incineration
Urea
Biomass
Electricity
Engines
Economics
Costs
Hot Temperature

Cite this

Mcclymont, D., Kolaczkowski, S., Molloy, K. C., & Awdry, S. (2012). Novel catalyst systems for deNOx. Poster session presented at IChemE Catalysis for Energy Meeting, University of Birmingham, UK United Kingdom.

Novel catalyst systems for deNOx. / Mcclymont, David; Kolaczkowski, Stan; Molloy, Kieran C; Awdry, Serpil.

2012. Poster session presented at IChemE Catalysis for Energy Meeting, University of Birmingham, UK United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Mcclymont, D, Kolaczkowski, S, Molloy, KC & Awdry, S 2012, 'Novel catalyst systems for deNOx' IChemE Catalysis for Energy Meeting, University of Birmingham, UK United Kingdom, 11/12/12, .
Mcclymont D, Kolaczkowski S, Molloy KC, Awdry S. Novel catalyst systems for deNOx. 2012. Poster session presented at IChemE Catalysis for Energy Meeting, University of Birmingham, UK United Kingdom.
Mcclymont, David ; Kolaczkowski, Stan ; Molloy, Kieran C ; Awdry, Serpil. / Novel catalyst systems for deNOx. Poster session presented at IChemE Catalysis for Energy Meeting, University of Birmingham, UK United Kingdom.
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