Not just 'skin deep': Psychosocial effects of dermatological-related social anxiety in a sample of acne patients

T Loney, M Standage, S Lewis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

74 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examined links between anxiety pertaining to having one's skin evaluated by others and intention to participate in sport/exercise, general self-esteem and dermatological quality of life. Data assessing dermatological-related social anxiety, perceived acne severity, intention to participate in sport/exercise, self-esteem and dermatological quality of life were obtained from 50 acne patients. Results showed dermatological-related social anxiety to be negatively associated with intention to participate in sport/exercise, self-esteem and dermatological quality of life. The relationship between patient-rated acne severity and outcome variables was found to be partially mediated by reported levels of dermatological-related social anxiety. The current findings suggest that how one perceives their skin to be evaluated by others has implications for self-perceptions and may act as a barrier to sport/exercise participation.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)47-54
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Health Psychology
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2008

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