Negative Psychological Experiences and Saliva Secretory Immunoglobulin A in Field Hockey Players

Ian M. Taylor, James E. Turner, Michael Gleeson, John Hough

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
170 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Understanding psychological factors that affect immunity in sport might help to reduce infection risk in athletes. The present study examined within-person changes and individual differences in perceived coach control, intentions to drop-out, and saliva secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA). Thirty-two field hockey players completed questionnaires and provided saliva samples over a two-month period. Within-person increases in individuals’ perceptions of psychological control and intentions to drop out were positively associated with SIgA concentration. Individual differences in control or drop out intentions were not associated with SIgA. Interventions in athletes to prevent immune disturbances and reduce infection should consider these psychological factors.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)67-78
Number of pages12
JournalJournal of Applied Sport Psychology
Volume27
Issue number1
Early online date11 Nov 2014
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

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