Negative association between injuries and team success in professional cricket: A 9-year prospective cohort analysis

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the relationship between injuries and team success in professional cricket. Design: Prospective cohort analysis. Methods: A prospective cohort of all match time-loss injuries and County Championship point tallies for nine seasons (from 2010 to 2018 inclusive) for all 18 First-Class County Cricket (FCCC) cricket teams in England and Wales. Two injury measures of match time-loss injury incidence and burden were assessed for within-team (linear mixed model on season-to-season changes) and between-team (correlation on differences averaged over all seasons) effects. County Championship league points tally was used as the measure of team success. Results: A moderate negative correlation was found between injury burden and team performance (r = −0.36; 90% CI −0.66 to 0.05; likely negative, P = 0.15). A reduction in match injury incidence of 2 match time-loss injuries per 1000 days of play (90% CI 1.4–2.9, P = 0.10) within a team, or a reduction in match injury burden of 75 days per 1000 days of play (90% CI 50–109, P = 0.053) in any given season was associated with the smallest worthwhile change in County Championship points (+13 points) for Division 1, but not for Division 2. Conclusion: Moderate reductions in injury burden are associated with potentially worthwhile effects on performance for a domestic cricket team in the County Championship Division 1.

Original languageEnglish
JournalJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport
Early online date3 Aug 2020
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 3 Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Burden
  • Incidence
  • Injury
  • Performance
  • Severity
  • Sports

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Negative association between injuries and team success in professional cricket: A 9-year prospective cohort analysis'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this