Narrative in class: a form of assessment to evaluate students' grammar accuracy and their ability to communicate in the target language

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

The presentation will investigate how written and oral assessments can be created using a narrative context as a reflective tool for testing the language grammar and the oral abilities of our students. The reading of a short story as an integrated part of the language syllabus becomes a key element to activate in our students a process of noticing: through the exploration of a narrative text students are exposed to a language model which brings with itself lexicon and grammar key elements relevant for our learners. The narrative scenario contributes to motivate our students thanks to the emotional impact that narration provokes in everyone’s life. Furthermore the narrative input becomes an opportunity to be turned towards output for the students and element of evaluation for the teachers.
The presentation will define some possible activities to be used in a written assessment such as the narrative cloze and the snap shot of a scene from the story to comment. It will also look at some narrative-based tasks to be used in oral assessments: improvisation activities and spoken narrative performances through theatre techniques can be used to evaluate students’ spontaneous oral production.

Cite this

Cecconi, E. (2017). Narrative in class: a form of assessment to evaluate students' grammar accuracy and their ability to communicate in the target language. Paper presented at SIS, Society for Italian Studies Biennal Conference, University of Hull, Hull, .

Narrative in class: a form of assessment to evaluate students' grammar accuracy and their ability to communicate in the target language. / Cecconi, Enrico.

2017. Paper presented at SIS, Society for Italian Studies Biennal Conference, University of Hull, Hull, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Cecconi, E 2017, 'Narrative in class: a form of assessment to evaluate students' grammar accuracy and their ability to communicate in the target language' Paper presented at SIS, Society for Italian Studies Biennal Conference, University of Hull, Hull, 27/06/17 - 30/06/17, .
Cecconi E. Narrative in class: a form of assessment to evaluate students' grammar accuracy and their ability to communicate in the target language. 2017. Paper presented at SIS, Society for Italian Studies Biennal Conference, University of Hull, Hull, .
Cecconi, Enrico. / Narrative in class: a form of assessment to evaluate students' grammar accuracy and their ability to communicate in the target language. Paper presented at SIS, Society for Italian Studies Biennal Conference, University of Hull, Hull, .
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abstract = "The presentation will investigate how written and oral assessments can be created using a narrative context as a reflective tool for testing the language grammar and the oral abilities of our students. The reading of a short story as an integrated part of the language syllabus becomes a key element to activate in our students a process of noticing: through the exploration of a narrative text students are exposed to a language model which brings with itself lexicon and grammar key elements relevant for our learners. The narrative scenario contributes to motivate our students thanks to the emotional impact that narration provokes in everyone’s life. Furthermore the narrative input becomes an opportunity to be turned towards output for the students and element of evaluation for the teachers. The presentation will define some possible activities to be used in a written assessment such as the narrative cloze and the snap shot of a scene from the story to comment. It will also look at some narrative-based tasks to be used in oral assessments: improvisation activities and spoken narrative performances through theatre techniques can be used to evaluate students’ spontaneous oral production.",
author = "Enrico Cecconi",
note = "Cameron, L. (2001). Teaching languages to young learners. Cambridge; New York, NY. Cambridge University Press. Ducci, G. (2015). Pasta per due. Firenze: Alma Edizioni. Godwin, D. & Perkins, M. (1998). Teaching language and literacy in the early years. London: David Fulton Publishers. Huang, C.C. (1996). Senior High Students’ vocabulary knowledge, content knowledge, reading comprehension. Proceedings of the Twelfth International Symposium on English teaching. pp. 391-402. Taipei: Crane. Krashen, S. (1989). The input hypothesis: Issues and implications. New York: Longman Phothongsunan, S. (2016). EFL Motivation through vision: Role-plays, Narratives, Projects and Reading Tasks. In Theory and Practice in Language Studies, Vol. 6, No.5, pp. 919 -923. Rupley, W. H.&.Nichols, W.D. (2005). Vocabulary instruction in a balanced reading program. The Reading Teacher, 52(9), 336-346. Wajnryb, R. (2003). Stories: Narrative activities for the language classroom. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press. Wilson, K. (2008). Drama and Improvisation. Oxford University Press. ; SIS, Society for Italian Studies Biennal Conference, University of Hull ; Conference date: 27-06-2017 Through 30-06-2017",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
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AB - The presentation will investigate how written and oral assessments can be created using a narrative context as a reflective tool for testing the language grammar and the oral abilities of our students. The reading of a short story as an integrated part of the language syllabus becomes a key element to activate in our students a process of noticing: through the exploration of a narrative text students are exposed to a language model which brings with itself lexicon and grammar key elements relevant for our learners. The narrative scenario contributes to motivate our students thanks to the emotional impact that narration provokes in everyone’s life. Furthermore the narrative input becomes an opportunity to be turned towards output for the students and element of evaluation for the teachers. The presentation will define some possible activities to be used in a written assessment such as the narrative cloze and the snap shot of a scene from the story to comment. It will also look at some narrative-based tasks to be used in oral assessments: improvisation activities and spoken narrative performances through theatre techniques can be used to evaluate students’ spontaneous oral production.

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