My neighbourhood: studying perceptions of urban space and neighbourhood with moblogging

Danaë Stanton Fraser, Tim Jay, Eamonn O’Neill, Alan Penn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We describe a novel methodology that examines perceptions of urban space, and present a study using this methodology that explores people's perceptions of their neighbourhood. Previous studies of spatial cues have involved a variety of tasks such as pointing and sketching to externalise participants' internal spatial maps. Our methodology extends these approaches by introducing mobile technologies alongside traditional materials and tasks. Participants use mobile phones to carry out self-guided neighbourhood tours. We collected rich qualitative data from 15 participants during two workshops and a self-directed neighbourhood tour. Our study highlights the use of public and private landmarks, differences in spatial maps of rural versus urban dwellers, and individual variance in orientation strategies. These themes suggest guidelines for the design of technologies with personalised spatial profiles.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)722-737
Number of pages16
JournalPervasive and Mobile Computing
Volume9
Issue number5
Early online date31 Jul 2012
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Oct 2013

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Mobile phones
Methodology
Mobile Technology
Sketching
Landmarks
Mobile Phone
Internal
Profile
Strategy
Design

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My neighbourhood: studying perceptions of urban space and neighbourhood with moblogging. / Stanton Fraser, Danaë; Jay, Tim; O’Neill, Eamonn; Penn, Alan.

In: Pervasive and Mobile Computing, Vol. 9, No. 5, 10.2013, p. 722-737.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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