Multi-stakeholder partnerships and the structuring of spaces between fields

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Multi- stakeholder partnerships were given new impetus in 'Agenda 2030' which requires 'bringing together Governments, civil society, the private sector, the United Nations system and other actors' (UN: General Assembly, 2015). Much existing literature treats partnerships as either normatively appropriate or instrumentally useful organisational models. Rather than conceptualising partnerships as a stable model in which differently-located partners may engage, the authors use Eyal's (2011) theorisation of 'spaces between fields', which are co-constructed by partners.

To examine these emerging spaces as they institutionalise, it is vital to examine partnering processes as connecting diverse partners from established fields. Partnership Boards are at the sharp end of partnering activities, bringing together partners representing diverse logics, professional expertise, and values. Therefore, the authors used network analysis (specifically, the Interlocking Directorates approach) to investigate the relationships among partners across several global financing partnerships for the Sustainable Development Goals (including agriculture, climate change, education, health, and water).

This analysis revealed that Board members from donors (state, private and multilateral) were more connected within the partnership space than other stakeholders. This would indicate the importance of historical relations of power and the privileging of certain types of expertise and knowledge in the emerging institutionalisation of partnerships. This article contributes an innovative theoretical framing to studies of partnerships and extends the insights of Eyal's approach. By focussing on the actual relationships that sustain and structure spaces between fields, the authors demonstrate how initial conditions and power disparities in constituent fields are translated and imprinted into emergent liminal spaces.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusAccepted/In press - Sep 2017
EventDevelopment Studies Association Annual Conference: Sustainability Interrogated: Societies, Growth, and Social Justice - University of Bradford, Bradford, UK United Kingdom
Duration: 6 Sep 20178 Sep 2017
https://www.devstud.org.uk/conferences/2017/index.shtml

Conference

ConferenceDevelopment Studies Association Annual Conference
Abbreviated titleDSA 2017
CountryUK United Kingdom
CityBradford
Period6/09/178/09/17
Internet address

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stakeholder
expertise
UN General Assembly
partner relationship
organizational model
network analysis
institutionalization
civil society
private sector
UNO
sustainable development
climate change
agriculture
water
health
Values
education

Cite this

Tchilingirian, J., & Faul, M. (Accepted/In press). Multi-stakeholder partnerships and the structuring of spaces between fields. Paper presented at Development Studies Association Annual Conference, Bradford, UK United Kingdom.

Multi-stakeholder partnerships and the structuring of spaces between fields. / Tchilingirian, Jordan; Faul, Moira.

2017. Paper presented at Development Studies Association Annual Conference, Bradford, UK United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Tchilingirian, J & Faul, M 2017, 'Multi-stakeholder partnerships and the structuring of spaces between fields' Paper presented at Development Studies Association Annual Conference, Bradford, UK United Kingdom, 6/09/17 - 8/09/17, .
Tchilingirian J, Faul M. Multi-stakeholder partnerships and the structuring of spaces between fields. 2017. Paper presented at Development Studies Association Annual Conference, Bradford, UK United Kingdom.
Tchilingirian, Jordan ; Faul, Moira. / Multi-stakeholder partnerships and the structuring of spaces between fields. Paper presented at Development Studies Association Annual Conference, Bradford, UK United Kingdom.
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