Monoallelic expression and tissue specificity are associated with high crossover rates

A Necsulea, M Semon, L Duret, L D Hurst

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

What determines the recombination rate of a gene? Following the observation that, in humans, imprinted genes have unusually high recombination levels, we ask whether increased recombination is seen for other monoallelically expressed genes and, more generally, how transcriptional properties relate to recombination. We find that monoallelically expressed genes do have high crossover rates and discover a striking negative correlation between within-gene crossover rate and expression breadth. We hypothesise that these findings are possibly symptomatic of a more general, adverse relationship between recombination and transcription in the human genome.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)519-522
Number of pages4
JournalTrends in Genetics
Volume25
Issue number12
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2009

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Organ Specificity
Genetic Recombination
Genes
Human Genome

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Monoallelic expression and tissue specificity are associated with high crossover rates. / Necsulea, A; Semon, M; Duret, L; Hurst, L D.

In: Trends in Genetics, Vol. 25, No. 12, 12.2009, p. 519-522.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Necsulea, A ; Semon, M ; Duret, L ; Hurst, L D. / Monoallelic expression and tissue specificity are associated with high crossover rates. In: Trends in Genetics. 2009 ; Vol. 25, No. 12. pp. 519-522.
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