Monge–Ampére based moving mesh methods for numerical weather prediction, with applications to the Eady problem

Chris J Budd, M. J. P. Cullen, E. J. Walsh

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We derive a moving mesh method based upon ideas from optimal transport theory which is suited to solving PDE problems in meteorology. In particular we show how the Parabolic Monge–Ampère method for constructing a moving mesh in two-dimensions can be coupled successfully to a pressure correction method for the solution of incompressible flows with significant convection and subject to Coriolis forces. This method can be used to resolve evolving small scale features in the flow. In this paper the method is then applied to the computation of the solution to the Eady problem which is observed to develop large gradients in a finite time. The moving mesh method is shown to work and be stable, and to give significantly better resolution of the evolving singularity than a fixed, uniform mesh.
LanguageEnglish
Pages247-270
Number of pages34
JournalJournal of Computational Physics
Volume236
Early online date10 Dec 2012
DOIs
StatusPublished - 1 Mar 2013

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Coriolis force
Meteorology
Incompressible flow
weather
mesh
predictions
pulse detonation engines
incompressible flow
transport theory
meteorology
convection
gradients
Convection

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Monge–Ampére based moving mesh methods for numerical weather prediction, with applications to the Eady problem. / Budd, Chris J; Cullen, M. J. P.; Walsh, E. J.

In: Journal of Computational Physics, Vol. 236, 01.03.2013, p. 247-270.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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