Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus Pure Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help for Perfectionism: a Pilot Randomised Study

Kirsty James, Katharine A. Rimes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This pilot study compared mindfulness-based cognitive therapy (MBCT) with a self-help guide based on cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) for university students experiencing difficulties due to perfectionism. Participants were randomised to an MBCT intervention specifically tailored for perfectionism or pure CBT self-help. Questionnaires were completed at baseline, 8 weeks later (corresponding to the end of MBCT) and at 10-week follow-up. Post-intervention intention-to-treat (ITT) analyses identified that MBCT participants (n = 28) had significantly lower levels of perfectionism and stress than self-help participants (n = 32). There was significant MBCT superiority for changes in unhelpful beliefs about emotions, rumination, mindfulness, self-compassion and decentering. At 10-week follow-up, effects were maintained in the MBCT group, and analyses showed superior MBCT outcomes for perfectionism and daily impairment caused by perfectionism. Pre-post changes in self-compassion significantly mediated the group differences in pre-post changes in clinical perfectionism. Greater frequency of mindfulness practice was associated with larger improvements in self-compassion. MBCT is a promising intervention for perfectionist students, which may result in larger improvements than pure CBT self-help. The findings require replication with a larger sample.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)801-814
Number of pages14
JournalMindfulness
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2018

Fingerprint

Mindfulness
self-help
Cognitive Therapy
behavior therapy
cognition
therapy group
Perfectionism
Students
emotion
Intention to Treat Analysis
student
questionnaire
university
Emotions

Keywords

  • Cognitive behavioural treatment
  • Mindfulness
  • Perfectionism
  • Self-compassion
  • Self-help
  • Students

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Applied Psychology

Cite this

Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy Versus Pure Cognitive Behavioural Self-Help for Perfectionism : a Pilot Randomised Study. / James, Kirsty; Rimes, Katharine A.

In: Mindfulness, Vol. 9, No. 3, 01.06.2018, p. 801-814.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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