Mind Matters: Treatment Concerns Predict the Emergence of Antiretroviral Therapy Side Effects in People with HIV

Rob Horne, Sarah Chapman, Elizabeth Glendinning, Heather Leake Date, Jordi Guitart, Vanessa Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

The aim of this analysis of historical data was to determine whether patients' pre-treatment beliefs about antiretroviral therapy (ART) predict the subsequent reporting of side effects. Data were collected as part of a prospective, 12-month follow-up study. Of 120 people starting ART, 76 completed follow-up assessments and were included in the analyses. Participants completed validated questionnaires assessing their beliefs about ART, beliefs about medicines in general, perceived sensitivity to adverse effects of medicines, depression and anxiety before initiating ART and after 1 and 6 months of treatment. Adherence was assessed at 1, 6 and 12 months. Pre-treatment concerns about ART were associated with significantly more side effects at 1 month (p < 0.05) and 6 months (p < 0.005). Side effects at 6 months predicted low adherence at 12 months (p < 0.005). These findings have implications for the development of interventions to support patients initiating ART by providing a mechanism to pre-empt and reduce side effects.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)489-498
Number of pages10
JournalAIDS and Behavior
Volume23
Issue number2
Early online date5 Sep 2018
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Sep 2018

Keywords

  • Adverse effects
  • Antiretroviral therapy
  • Beliefs
  • HIV

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

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