Methods that move: A physical performative pedagogy of subjectivity

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Abstract

Driven by a desire to interrogate and articulate the role and place of the body in the study of sport, this paper encourages those who are incited by a richer understanding of the physical to expand and elaborate upon the fleshy figuration that guides the research projects and practices/strategies of the present. This call for papers is an opportunity to unpack the methodological impetus of ‘body work’ (Giardina & Newman, 2011a) and to locate it within the nexus of dialogues that expressly seek to re-engage an eclectic body politic at precisely the time when the body is a site of continuous scrutinising and scientific confession. As researchers we grapple with and problematize method(ologies) in light of the conjunctural demands placed upon our scholarship and so I reflect on a recently conducted project and the methodological moments that it brought to light. Conceptualized in terms of a physical performative pedagogy of subjectivity, I tentatively forward a discussion of what moving methods might look and feel like and thus I question why, when we research into physical, sporting, (in)active experiences, do we refrain from putting the body to work? Why do we not theorise the body through the moving body?
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)256-273
Number of pages17
JournalSociology of Sport Journal
Volume30
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2013

Keywords

  • movement
  • research methods
  • knowledge
  • subjectivity
  • body
  • pedagogy

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