Methodological considerations in cognitive bias research

The next steps

Alia F Ataya, Sally Adams, Emma Mullings, Robbie M Cooper, Angela S Attwood, Marcus R Munafò

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Field and Christiansen (2012) comment on the importance of establishing and understanding the internal reliability of measures of substance-related cognitive bias, and suggest potential reasons for the poor reliability of some task variants. We agree that the impact of using stimuli personalized to the participant on the reliability of cognitive bias tasks is worthy of systematic investigation. However, some tasks may still be inherently less reliable than others. Ultimately, this debate should be framed within the wider debate on the validity of laboratory models and methods used to assess real-world phenomena.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)191-192
Number of pages2
JournalDrug and Alcohol Dependence
Volume124
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Aug 2012

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Keywords

  • alcohol drinking
  • attention
  • female
  • humans
  • male
  • smoking

Cite this

Methodological considerations in cognitive bias research : The next steps. / Ataya, Alia F; Adams, Sally; Mullings, Emma; Cooper, Robbie M; Attwood, Angela S; Munafò, Marcus R.

In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence, Vol. 124, No. 3, 01.08.2012, p. 191-192.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ataya, Alia F ; Adams, Sally ; Mullings, Emma ; Cooper, Robbie M ; Attwood, Angela S ; Munafò, Marcus R. / Methodological considerations in cognitive bias research : The next steps. In: Drug and Alcohol Dependence. 2012 ; Vol. 124, No. 3. pp. 191-192.
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