Metal triflates as catalytic curing agents in self-healing fibre reinforced polymer composite materials

Tim S. Coope, Duncan F. Wass, Richard S. Trask, Ian P. Bond

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A self-healing, high performance, fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) composite material is demonstrated by employing a Lewis acid-catalysed epoxy self-healing agent (SHA) within a laminate manufactured using existing industrial methods. Thermal cure analysis and mechanical testing is employed to characterise the self-healed polymer. A bio-inspired series of vascules incorporated into an FRP composite material facilitates the delivery of SHAs to exposed fractured crack planes. Healing is effected by ring-opening polymerisation (ROP) of an epoxy resin using novel metal triflate catalysts injected after Mode I crack opening displacement. Strong adhesive compatibility with the host matrix confers full recovery of mechanical properties (>99% healing). An in-house developed Lewis acid-catalysed self-healing system, comprised of solid-phase metal triflate catalysts and diglycidyl ether bisphenol A (DGEBA) epoxy resin, is employed to achieve full fracture toughness recovery of the fibre reinforced polymer composite material. Mechanical testing of the healed material clearly shows a ductile failure, a failure mechanism not typically associated with inherently brittle materials such as epoxy.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)208-218
Number of pages11
JournalMacromolecular Materials and Engineering
Volume299
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Feb 2014

Fingerprint

Curing
Polymers
Metals
Epoxy Resins
Lewis Acids
Fibers
Mechanical testing
Composite materials
Epoxy resins
Cracks
Recovery
Catalysts
Acids
Ring opening polymerization
Brittleness
Thermoanalysis
Laminates
Fracture toughness
Ethers
Adhesives

Keywords

  • bio-inspired
  • ductile failure
  • epoxy
  • ring-opening polymerisation
  • self-healing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Organic Chemistry
  • Materials Chemistry
  • Polymers and Plastics
  • Chemical Engineering(all)

Cite this

Metal triflates as catalytic curing agents in self-healing fibre reinforced polymer composite materials. / Coope, Tim S.; Wass, Duncan F.; Trask, Richard S.; Bond, Ian P.

In: Macromolecular Materials and Engineering, Vol. 299, No. 2, 02.2014, p. 208-218.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Coope, Tim S. ; Wass, Duncan F. ; Trask, Richard S. ; Bond, Ian P. / Metal triflates as catalytic curing agents in self-healing fibre reinforced polymer composite materials. In: Macromolecular Materials and Engineering. 2014 ; Vol. 299, No. 2. pp. 208-218.
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