Mental health hospital admissions: a teachable moment and window of opportunity to promote change in drug and alcohol misuse

Hermine L. Graham, Alex Copello, Emma Griffith, Latoya Clarke, Kathryn Walsh, Amanda L. Baker, Max Birchwood

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Hospital admissions provide a “teachable moment”. Many patients admitted to mental health hospitals have co-existing substance misuse. As acute symptoms decline, a window of increased insight into factors that contributed to becoming unwell and admission may present. This study used this “teachable” opportunity to assess the acceptability of delivering a brief integrated motivational intervention (BIMI) to inpatients and the feasibility of delivery by inpatient staff. Qualitative interviews were completed with 21 inpatients experiencing co-occurring schizophrenia-related or bipolar disorder diagnoses and substance misuse who received the BIMI. Twelve staff members completed either individual interviews or a focus group. Four themes were identified from the qualitative interviews with participants; these were openness/readiness to talk about substance use, feeling valued, understanding substance use and helpful skills and processes; each with a number of subthemes. Participants appeared to find the intervention useful; although, felt they did not always have the “headspace”. One theme emerged from the staff data, the acceptability of the approach for inpatient ward staff, which had four subthemes; training in the intervention; delivering the intervention; joint working; and feasibility. Staff considered the targeted style of the BIMI useful. Delivery considerations included “timing” and competing ward duties. Hospital admission presents a natural window of opportunity for staff to start conversations with inpatients about substance misuse.
LanguageEnglish
Pages1 - 19
Number of pages19
JournalInternational Journal of Mental Health and Addiction
Early online date26 Feb 2018
DOIs
StatusE-pub ahead of print - 26 Feb 2018

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Psychiatric Hospitals
Inpatients
Mental Health
Alcohols
Pharmaceutical Preparations
Interviews
Focus Groups
Schizophrenia
Emotions
Joints

Cite this

Mental health hospital admissions : a teachable moment and window of opportunity to promote change in drug and alcohol misuse. / Graham, Hermine L.; Copello, Alex; Griffith, Emma; Clarke, Latoya; Walsh, Kathryn; Baker, Amanda L.; Birchwood, Max.

In: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction, 26.02.2018, p. 1 - 19.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Graham, Hermine L. ; Copello, Alex ; Griffith, Emma ; Clarke, Latoya ; Walsh, Kathryn ; Baker, Amanda L. ; Birchwood, Max. / Mental health hospital admissions : a teachable moment and window of opportunity to promote change in drug and alcohol misuse. In: International Journal of Mental Health and Addiction. 2018 ; pp. 1 - 19.
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