Men and women could use different cells to process pain

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

We have known for some time that there are sex differences when it comes to experiencing pain, with women showing a higher sensitivity to painful events compared to men.
Original languageEnglish
Specialist publicationThe Conversation
Publication statusPublished - 30 Jun 2015

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Sex Characteristics
Pain

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Men and women could use different cells to process pain. / Keogh, Edmund.

In: The Conversation, 30.06.2015.

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

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