Maximizing specific work output extracted from engine exhaust with novel inverted Brayton cycles over a large range of operating conditions

Noémie Chagnon-Lessard, Colin Copeland, François Mathieu-Potvin, Louis Gosselin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The heat contained in internal combustion engine exhaust gases can be converted into mechanical energy by using an Inverted Brayton Cycle (IBC). In this paper, five different IBC versions are numerically modeled and optimized to maximize their specific work output: (i) basic IBC, (ii) IBC with liquid water drainage (IBC/D), (iii) IBC with liquid water drainage and a steam turbine (IBC/D/S), (iv) IBC with liquid water drainage and a refrigeration cycle (IBC/D/R), and (v) IBC with liquid water drainage, a steam turbine and a refrigeration cycle (IBC/D/S/R). The three latter cycles are presented for the first time in literature. The optimization is performed for a wide range of inlet gases temperatures (600–1200 K) and heat sink temperatures (280–340 K). Among the five IBCs, the IBC/D/S/R has the highest specific work output for the whole range of operating temperatures. A comparison with the subcritical Rankine cycle and Organic Rankine Cycles using isobutane and benzene shows that an IBC system might be a better choice for specific operating temperatures. Liquid water addition in the IBC/D/S/R leads to optimized designs using only the steam turbine at high inlet gas temperatures, indicating that a Rankine cycle is better suited for these conditions.
Original languageEnglish
Article number116350
JournalEnergy
Early online date15 Oct 2019
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 15 Jan 2020

Keywords

  • Bottoming cycles
  • Design optimization
  • Engine exhaust heat recovery
  • Inverted Brayton cycle (IBC)
  • Open Rankine cycle
  • Water drainage

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction
  • Pollution
  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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